LOCAL ELECTIONS MATTER -- EARLY VOTING FOR THE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2017 GENERAL ELECTIONS BEGINS ON MONDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2017 AND ENDS ON FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2017

A few of the people featured in this edition of Houston Business Connections Magazine© are Governor Greg Abbott, Mayor Sylvester Turner, Mayor Allen Owen, Dr. Letitia Plummer, Sheriff Troy E. Nehls, Fort Bend County Judge Bob Hebert, Carolyn Evans-Shabazz, Manny Berrera, Daniel "DC" Caldwell, Robert Glaser, Victoria Bryant, Eugene "Gene" Pack, David Jaroszewski, Pretta VanDible Stallworth, Monica Flores Richart, Elizabeth Santos, Gretchen Himsl, Carlos Perrett, Sergio Lira, Rodolfo (Rudy) Reyes, Jesse A. Rodriguez, Susan Shafer, Sue Deigaard, Kara DeRocha, Sean Cheben, Daniel Albert, Robert Lundin and Holly Flynn Vilaseca, Anne Katherine Sung, John Luman, Wanda Adams, Karla Brown and Gerry W. Monroe. Houston Business Connections Magazine is published by Aubrey R. Taylor Communications. Call (832)212-8735 for more information.

Friday, May 3, 2013

OPEN THOUGHTS: Mayor Annise Parker, Council Member Andrew C. Burks, Jr., Council Member Ellen Cohen, Shared Thoughts on How They Select The Best Candidate In An Election -- The 2013 Mayoral Election In Houston is Tuesday, November 5, 2013

 
ABOUT THE LEADERS PICTURE ABOVE: Mayor Annise Parker is serving her second term as Mayor of Houston and represents the entire city of Houston as mayor, (pictured on the left), Councilman Andrew C. Burks, Jr., is currently serving his first term as an At-Large Houston City Council Member and represents the entire city of Houston as an at-large council member, (pictured in the middle), Councilwoman Ellen Cohen is currently serving her first term as the District C representative on Houston’s city council. The district represented by Council Member Cohen is approximately 15 miles long (north to south), with about 200,000 constituents. Its boundaries include: Oak Forest, Garden Oaks, Timbergrove, Lazybrook, Shady Acres, the Heights, the Washington/Memorial Corridor, Rice Military, 4th Ward, Montrose, Midtown, Upper Kirby, Southhampton, Rice Village, Braeswood, Meyerland, and Maplewood. NOTE: The leaders pictured above are not connected or affiliated with one another unless otherwise noted. These shared thoughts should not (and does not) constitute an endorsement of any of these individuals by Aubrey R. Taylor Communications, Your Thought Matters Newspaper or its advertisers or supporters unless otherwise noted. However, you are encouraged to support our advertisers and supporters whenever possible -- for they make it possible for us to inspire, empower, and inform the readers of our products. Call (832)212-8735 to discuss your inclusion. This content may not be reproduced in an form without the expressed written consent of Aubrey R. Taylor Communications. 



MAYOR ANNISE D. PARKER

Mayor Annise Parker has spent many years in service to the people of Houston, with six years as a City Council member and six years as City Controller. She is the first person in Houston's history to hold the offices of council member, controller and mayor. This is her second term as mayor; and she is seeking re-election to a third in the 2013 Mayoral Election to be held on Tuesday, November 5, 2013 in the City of Houston. 

Mayor Annise Parker and her life partner Kathy Hubbard have been together for more than 20 years and are advocates for adoption, with two adopted daughters and a son.

A LEADER ON LEADERSHIP: Mayor Annise Parker Shares A Few Thoughts On How She Goes About Identifying the best Candidate In An Election 

AUBREY R. TAYLOR: “As a voter, how do you go about selecting the person who is the best candidate in any given election? And what are a few of the characteristics you look for in a leader?”

MAYOR ANNISE PARKER: “It is wrong to run for office just to be in politics; elected officeholders should want to work toward change that will improve the lives of those they represent. I have often said that my job is the best job available because I have the opportunity everyday to truly impact our great city and its residents for the better. When I am personally deciding which candidates to support in an election, obviously, I look for someone who shares my views and positions on the issues. I also look for someone who is passionate, exhibits leadership qualities and is motivated to serve.

Leadership is not simply taking the reigns and getting the job done. A leader also has to be willing to listen to different points of view, flexible enough to change course when the original path proves unworkable or will create an undesirable outcome. And a leader must be willing to compromise. They need to be genuinely concerned about their constituents, and about improving the area they will represent. Ultimately, however, a leader needs to be able to generate consensus through a cooperative approach and stand strong even when the final decision may not be politically popular.”


Annise Parker
The 61st Mayor of Houston, Texas

Here's A Little About Mayor Annise Parker 

Mayor Parker is Houston’s 61st mayor and one of only two women to hold the City’s highest elected office. As the City's chief executive officer, she is responsible for all aspects of the general management of the City and for enforcement of all laws and ordinances.

Parker has spent many years in service to the people of Houston, with six years as a City Council member and six years as City Controller. She is the only person in Houston history to hold the offices of council member, controller and mayor. This is her second term as mayor.

Parker’s accomplishments as mayor include job growth far exceeding the number of jobs lost during the recession, resulting in Houston being named the job growth capital of the nation. In addition, she bucked the trend of most other major U.S. cities by balancing three city budgets during the tough economic times without raising taxes or having to eliminate police or firefighter jobs.

The mayor’s tenure also includes passage and implementation of Rebuild Houston, a pay-as-you-go comprehensive street and drainage improvement program that will provide jobs for Houstonians for years to come; voter approval of a $410 public improvement bond program; creation of an independent organization to oversee the City’s crime lab operations; a unique sobering center for public intoxication cases; adoption of a long-term financial plan that ensures the stability of the City’s water department and reorganization of City departments to achieve cost savings and more efficient operations. She created a new City department focused on the needs of neighborhoods and the Office of Business Opportunity to help minority and women-owned small business enterprises compete for City contracts. Additionally, she won City Council approval of a Historic Preservation Ordinance that, for the first time, provides real protection for historic properties in City-designated historic districts and she issued one of the most comprehensive non-discrimination orders in the nation.

Fast Company magazine selected Houston as City of the Year for 2011 and in 2010, Time magazine named Mayor Parker one the 100 most influential people in the world. She has also been the recipient of numerous awards during her career, including the 2011 Guardian of the Bay Award from the Galveston Bay Foundation, Scenic Houston’s 2010 Scenic Visionary Award and the 2010 Guardian of the Human Spirit Award from the Holocaust Museum Houston.

In addition to her duties as mayor, Parker is an active member of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, serves as a member of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary’s Advisory Council and on the boards of the Texas Environmental Research Consortium and Houston Galveston Area Council. She is an advisory board member of the Holocaust Museum, Center for Houston’s Future and Montrose Center.

Mayor Parker is a second generation native Houstonian. She graduated from Rice University with a Bachelor of Arts Degree. In the private sector, Parker spent 20 years working in the oil and gas industry, including 18 years with Mosbacher Energy Company. She also co-owned a retail bookstore for 10 years.

Parker and her life partner Kathy Hubbard have been together for more than 20 years and are advocates for adoption, with two adopted daughters and a son.



COUNCIL MEMBER ANDREW C. BURKS, JR.

Andrew C. Burks, Jr., is the Position 2 At-Large Houston City Council Member


A LEADER ON LEADERSHIP: At-Large City of Houston Council Member Andrew C. Burks, Jr. Shares A Few Thoughts On How he Goes About Identifying the best Candidate In An Election 

AUBREY R. TAYLOR: “As a voter, how do you go about selecting the person who is the best candidate in any given election? And what are a few of the characteristics you look for in a leader?”

COUNCIL MEMBER BURKS: “Our leaders should share our goals and values. When I am personally deciding who to vote for, I look for the candidate who best understands my needs and the aspirations of the community. Strong leaders listen to the people they represent, understand their concerns and aspirations and form a plan to deliver a solution. Successful candidates should be able to empathize with their voters and proactively work to solve the problems brought to their attention. Our neighbors who are hands-on and involved in the community make the best leaders.

Leadership is about more than just making decisions and giving speeches – it is about listening. Selecting a candidate who takes time out of their schedule to visit with you or an organization you are a part of goes a long way. I look for candidates who can roll up their sleeves and accomplish their goals. This takes hard work, perseverance and a willingness to find common ground. On Election Day, the candidate who understands the needs of the community with a plan to improve the lives of all he or she represents earns my vote.”


Andrew C. Burks Jr.
Houston City Council At-Large Position 2

Here’s A Little About Council Member Andrew C. Burks, Jr. 

Andrew C. Burks, Jr. is a native Houstonian with a passion for making Houston the best city in the country to live, do business and raise a family. Growing up, Andrew’s parents instilled in him high moral values and taught him the importance of giving back to the community. Andrew grew up in Houston’s Third Ward and graduated from Jack Yates High School. Andrew continued his education at San Jacinto Junior College, Houston Community College and later Texas Southern University.

Andrew Burks served in the United States Air Force, and is a proud military veteran. Andrew’s commitment to community extends to his leadership with the YMCA and Red Shield Boys’ Club. Having served as president of his local civic club, Councilman Burks understands neighborhood quality of life issues. Andrew has dedicated his time to understanding constituent concerns and solving problems for Houstonians.

A successful small business owner, Andrew achieved entrepreneurial success in launching Am-PM Telephone Service, Inc., the first African American owned telephone company in Houston. Andrew continues to serve as CEO today.

Leading Our City Forward 

Andrew Burks is committed to Houston’s future. As a small businessman, Andrew is focusing on economic development and job creation. As a veteran, Andrew is especially interesting in veterans’ quality of life issues. As a member of City Council, Andrew is working to bolster small businesses, international business, tackle homelessness, increase the quality of life for Houston seniors and boost tourism. Andrew is making sure the city uses resources responsibly and ensures the financial health of Houston for years to come.

Creating jobs and honoring our veterans and seniors is an important focus for Councilmember Burks. Working together, Andrew is moving toward making Houston a world class city for individuals of all backgrounds. To that end, Andrew brings religious and community representatives to the table from all walks of life to help create policy benefiting all Houstonians.

Andrew’s interests on City Council include a strong dedication to working with civil clubs, super neighborhood organizations and local non-profit organizations, increasing accountability and cooperation between City Hall and neighborhoods.

Andrew welcomes input from Houston residents and looks forward to helping solve problems for the citizens of Houston.


COUNCIL MEMBER ELLEN COHEN

Ellen Cohen is the District C Representative on Houston's City Council


A LEADER ON LEADERSHIP: Houston City Council Member Ellen Cohen Shares A Few Thoughts On How she Identifies the best Candidate In An Election 

AUBREY R. TAYLOR: “As a voter, how do you go about selecting the person who is the best candidate in any given election? And what are a few of the characteristics you look for in a leader?”

COUNCIL MEMBER COHEN: “As both an elected official and a long-time voter, I have become familiar with both sides of the coin when it comes to choosing between political candidates. The question of who will represent you at the local, state, and federal level of government could not be more critical, so it is important to be well-informed about the candidates and the issues.

I believe all politics is local, so when selecting a representative, my first step is to research the issues the elected official will actually be voting on, and find out what each candidate’s views are on those specific issues. I am drawn to leaders that are passionate about these local issues and pragmatic about problem-solving. Grandstanding about challenges is no substitute for a solid plan of action, so the ability to think critically is also imperative to me.

As a Council Member and a former State Representative, I have found that another trait essential to good governance is the ability to work with those whose opinions differ from your own. Without the ability to build a consensus, a lawmaker will come to a stalemate in office.

Ultimately, I vote for candidates who share my viewpoint, are passionate about local issues, and are able to implement effective solutions for bettering their community.”


Ellen Cohen
Houston City Council District C

Here’s A Little About Council Member Ellen Cohen 

Advocate

While a single event doesn’t define an individual, the event’s impact can shape the future. Such was the case when Ellen Cohen was diagnosed with breast cancer before she was 30 years of age. Living in her late husband Lyon’s hometown of Montreal at the time, she had questions her doctors could not answer. The support of her family, an instinct for survival, and an inquisitive mind sustained her. In fact, as soon as she was able, she determined that no other woman would endure the diagnosis of breast cancer alone, and she founded Reach to Recovery of Canada, a self-help post-mastectomy group. The program was in all Montreal hospitals when the Cohen family left Quebec.

Ellen could have returned to her native Ohio when the family – including daughter Marcie and son Eric — relocated to the U.S. in 1977. Instead, she and Lyon chose Texas, in part, because “things were settled with a handshake.” With its black gold under the ground and intellectual black gold above, the state was on the move. Ellen’s administrative acumen fit right in. Houston offered unlimited possibilities resulting in yet another advocacy role as executive director of the American Jewish Committee (AJC). There she worked with the leadership from Houston’s diverse religious and business communities to foster mutual understanding and tolerance for one of the nation’s premiere human relations organizations.

After a decade with AJC, she served as President and CEO of the Houston Area Women’s Center (HAWC) for 18 years. Dedicated to eliminating domestic and sexual violence, the Center again allowed for the blending of her executive leadership abilities with her compassion. In that capacity, she managed a $6.2 million budget and a 120-person staff, serving over 6,000 women, children, and men annually. Ellen continues to be recognized nationally as an expert on domestic and sexual violence issues.

Following almost 20 years at the Houston Area Women’s Center, Ellen was presented with the opportunity to become an entirely different kind of advocate – that of an elected official.

Public Servant 

In 2005, Ellen was encouraged by a group of leaders in the community to consider running for the position of State Representative, District 134. She felt it was a natural extension of the work she had been doing in Houston for the past 28 years. On November 7, 2006, Ellen Cohen was elected to the Texas House of Representatives with the largest margin of any challenger to an incumbent in Texas at that time. During her two terms in the Texas Legislature, Ellen worked diligently to restore balance and integrity to the Texas Legislature and her record reflects this commitment. She is widely respected by her former colleagues, both Democrats and Republicans, for her ability to work “across the aisle” and bring reasoned discourse to Austin.

Ellen served on various committees’ during her tenure in the Texas Legislature including Appropriations, Higher Education, Public Health, Rules & Resolutions, Select Committee of Federal Legislation, and Urban Affairs.

Ellen worked on significant legislation as a member of the Texas House of Representatives. She was the first House sponsor of the bill creating the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) that funds grants addressing cancer research, clinical trials, and laboratory facility construction in Texas. In addition, she authored and passed legislation with the goal of providing $25 million for adult and child survivors of sexual assault through an Adult Entertainment Fee and co-authored the bill creating the Texas Holocaust and Genocide Commission. As a member of the Appropriations Committee, Ellen helped craft a $182 billion biennium budget which unanimously passed the House. She was also the joint author on the bill which set the stage to create more Tier One research universities across Texas, including the University of Houston.

Ellen’s career choices are a reflection of her commitment to public service. She is dedicated to continued public service and giving back to the City of Houston.

Houstonian and Community Leader 

Ellen dedicates her time to serving on various boards with a significant impact on the Houston community. She serves or has served on the boards of: American Cancer Society, American Leadership Forum Executive Committee; American Jewish Committee; City of Houston Housing and Community Development Consolidated Plan Advisory Task Force, Congregation Beth Israel; Cool Globes Houston Programming Advisory Board; Faith Trust Institute; Houston Area Adult Protective Services; Museum of Fine Arts-Houston Board of Trustees; Park Plaza Hospital Board; and Police Advisory Board. She is also a former President of Leadership Houston and the Medical Center Hospital Board.

Ellen was appointed by President Bill Clinton along with the US Attorney General and the Secretary of Health and Human Services to the National Violence Against Women Advisory Council. She accepted this role because of the need for comprehensive language dealing with domestic violence and sexual assault. She was also appointed to the Governor’s Planning Council for the STOP Violence Against Women campaign. The Supreme Court of Texas appointed Ellen to the Gender Fairness Implementation Executive Committee. In addition, Texas House Speaker Joe Straus appointed her to the serve on the Texas Holocaust and Genocide Commission following her sponsorship of the bill establishing the Commission.

Council Member 

After two terms in the Legislature, Ellen decided to continue her public service career at home and announced her candidacy for Houston City Council District C. She was sworn into office in January 2011 as the first City Council Member to represent the newly-redistricted District C.

Due to the 2010 Census, the City of Houston underwent redistricting to reflect our population growth throughout the last decade. The original districts were redrawn, and two new Districts were added. The newly-set District C is an exciting mix of neighborhoods and urban life, and this map will remain in place through the end of 2020. District C is approximately 15 miles long (north to south), with about 200,000 constituents. Its boundaries include: Oak Forest, Garden Oaks, Timbergrove, Lazybrook, Shady Acres, the Heights, the Washington/Memorial Corridor, Rice Military, 4th Ward, Montrose, Midtown, Upper Kirby, Southhampton, Rice Village, Braeswood, Meyerland, and Maplewood. Ellen is thrilled to be representing such a diverse and active portion of the City!

As the Council Member for District C, Ellen has been appointed by Mayor Parker as the Vice Chair of the Public Safety Committee. She is currently serving on three other Council Committees as well: Budget & Fiscal Affairs; Ethics, Elections, & Council Governance; and Quality of Life. She looks forward to advocating for her constituents throughout her first term on Council, and is delighted and honored to have the opportunity to do so!



Please Help Us Spread The Word

If you live in Fort Bend County or know someone who lives in Missouri City (Texas) or Fort Bend County please do us a favor and tell them about this very important General Election about to go down in their county/city on Saturday, May 11, 2013.

We're currently focusing our efforts on highlighting the 2013 General Election in Missouri City, Texas. This is a very important election as Mayor Allen Owen and the entire sitting Missouri City Council are presenting over (15) fifteen propositions for voter approval. There are also, two Missouri City Council seats being contested in this election. In District A Incumbent Bobby Marshall is being challenged by Rodney Griffin and Yolanda Ford. In District B Incumbent Don Smith is being challenged by Henderson James Hunter, Jr for his seat at the Missouri City Council table. Please remind everyone you know about the importance of this election taking place on Saturday, May 11, 2013 in Missouri City Texas. If you have any questions, or would like to be included on our blog or in our new newspaper call: (832)212-8735.You can call me directly at: (832)894-1352.

Important Dates for the Saturday, May 11, 2013 General Election to be held in Fort Bend County/Missouri City Texas:

Ballots by Mail May Be Requested
-- Tuesday, March 12 - May 3, 2013

Last Day to Register to Vote
-- Thursday, April 11, 2013

Early Voting Period
-- Mon., April 29 - Tues.,, May 7, 2013

The 2013 General Election Day
-- Saturday, May 11, 2013

Don't Forget To Help Us Spread The Word About The Upcoming Election!

VOTE EARLY IN THE 2013 GENERAL ELECTION

Aubrey R. Taylor Communications, the publisher of Your Thought Matters Newspaper is urging all Fort Bend County voters to vote early at one of the locations listed below:

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday -- April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- CLOSED
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday -- May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday -- April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday -- May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday -- May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday -- May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- CLOSED
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday -- May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday - May 5, 2013 - CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday -- May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday -- May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday -- May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- CLOSED
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday -- May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precint (s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- CLOSED
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday -- May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday - May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday - May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 --8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday -- May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- CLOSED
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday -- May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 7:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- CLOSED
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday - May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday -- May 6 - 7, 2013 - 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 --10:00 AM - 7:00 PM 
Saturday -- May 4, 2013 -- CLOSED
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday - May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Precinct(s): All

Monday - Friday - April 29 - May 3, 2013 -- 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Saturday - May 4, 2013 -- CLOSED
Sunday - May 5, 2013 -- CLOSED
Monday - Tuesday - May 6 - 7, 2013 -- 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM




DON'T FORGET TO REMIND EVERYONE YOU KNOW IN FORT BEND COUNTY TO VOTE IN THE SATURDAY, MAY 11TH GENERAL ELECTION



MISSOURI CITY, TEXAS: Watch Out for the Missouri City Council District A Race involving Bobby Marshall, Rodney Griffin and Yolanda Ford on Saturday, May 11, 2013

By Aubrey R. Taylor
President, Aubrey R. Taylor Communications
The Publisher of Your Thought Matters Newspaper

Back in the 2011 General Election face off in Missouri City for the District A City Council seat Rodney Griffin came within 33 votes of unseating the incumbent Bobby Marshall. However, a dismal 6.52% voter turnout in the (6) six precinct district largely made up of African-American voters proved a little too much for Griffin to overcome in his quest to unseat the incumbent. But Rodney L. Griffin is back on the ballot again in the 2013 General Election to be held on Saturday, May 11, 2013. However, he's not facing the incumbent alone this time around. Yolanda Ford, a local architectural designer and urban planner is also in the race seeking to unseat Councilman Bobby Marshall.


-- CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT TRUSTEE JIM RICE





Missouri City At Large Position II Council Member Danny Nguyen (far left) is the Economic Development Committee Chair. Council Member Nguyen at an Economic Development effort with Fort Bend County Judge Bob Hebert (second photo). Council Member Nguyen at the appreciation of safety event with Constable Ruben Davis.


-- CLICK HERE IF YOU CAN VOTE IN THE MISSOURI CITY 2013 ELECTION









-- CLICK HERE TO SEE THE LIST OF LEADERS BACKING BOBBY MARSHALL


-- CHECK OUT THE STATE OF MISSOURI CITY -- BY RODNEY L. GRIFFIN

Businessman Rodney Griffin continues to campaign tirelessly for the revitalization of Texas Parkway. He has served the Missouri City community as the Presiding Election Judge for many terms. Presently he serve Precinct 2059 as the Democratic Chair and on the State Democratic Executive Committee in Austin. According to Griffin he was the first State (Texas) party official to endorse then candidate Obama for president (Feb, 22, 2007). During the de centennial census, he made sure that every person in the Missouri City community was counted.