Governor Greg Abbott Has Set Tuesday, July 14, 2020, as the date for the Democratic and Republican Primary Runoff Elections to Take Place

On Tuesday, July 14, 2020, MJ Hegar, Royce West, Sima Ladjevardian, Michael Siegel, Pritesh Gandhi, Roberto Alonzo, Chrysta Castaneda, Michelle Palmer, Kimberly R. McLeod, Akilah Bacy, Jenifer Rene Pool, Harold Dutton, Jerry Davis, Anna Eastman, Penny Shaw, Tamika Craft, Cheri Thomas, Alexandra Smoots Thomas, Cheryl Elliott Thornton, Te'iva Bell, Candance White, Diana Alexander, Michael Moore, Isreal Garcia, Roel Garcia, Chris Diaz, Jerry Garcia, Sherman Eagleton, Ken Jones, Randal Newman, and Mark Alan Harrison are on the Democratic Primary Runoff ballot. Wendell Champion, Robert M. Cadena, Troy Nehls, Kathaleen Wall, Terry Adams, James Lombardino, Joe Danna, Paul Day, Mike Wolfe, Russ Ridgway, James Pressler, JJ Clemence, Ro'vin Garrett, and Cody Vasut are on the Republican Primary Runoff ballot. Houston Business Connections Newspaper© is published by Aubrey R. Taylor Communications. All Rights Reserved.


Friday, May 22, 2020

Something Smells Fishy About Christopher Hollins Being Chosen Over the Much More Experienced Teneshia Hudspeth Babalola


Attorney Christopher Hollins (left) being appointed as the interim-Harris County Clerk during what could be the most important “PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION” of our lifetime earlier this week raised a lot of eyebrows. Especially when a duly-qualified African American female with more than 15 years of experience by the name of Teneshia Hudspeth Babalola was available for the choosing. What was going through the minds of Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo, Commissioner Rodney Ellis, and Commissioner Adrian Garcia when they selected Christopher Hollins over the more experienced Teneshia Hudspeth Babalola? What was their rationale? Did Chris Hollins' ties to Harris County Democratic Party Chairwoman Lillie Schechter and her father, Richard Schechter play a role? Do you still believe that Dr. Diane Trautman resigned her position purely because of health reasons? Does who you know, play a greater role than what you know in Harris County, Texas? Why did Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo sign off on allowing Christopher Hollins’ law firm to be able to bill Harris County at a rate of $900.00 per hour when he only had 5 years of legal experience? Is there something that Harris County Democrats are trying to cover up inside the Harris County Clerk’s Office between now and when a new Harris County Clerk will take office following the Tuesday, November 3, 2020, general election? Is it possible that the lesser-experienced Christopher Hollins was chosen because Harris County Commissioner Rodney Ellis, affectionately known as the “PUPPET MASTER” in some circles is going to be acting as the pseudo – Harris County Clerk over the next few months? Will Commissioner Ellis be the one calling the shots in the upcoming Tuesday, July 14, 2020, primary runoffs, and Tuesday, November 3, 2020, general election? Did you know that Attorney Christopher Hollins could end up making a whopping $3,600 per hour if he, Attorney Richard Schechter (the father of Harris County Democratic Party Chairwoman Lillie Schechter), the Law Firm of Baker Wotring, L.L.P, and Attorney Joanne Cicala are successful at recovering damages per their “PROFESSIONAL SERVICES AGREEMENT” with Harris County -- that's already in place? Did you know that Attorney Christopher Hollins according to a recently published report has more than 96 cases pending in various courts? Do you smell that? Doesn't something smell fishy about the selection of Attorney Christopher Hollins over Teneshia Hudspeth Babalobla who is already familiar with how the Harris County Clerk's Office operates?

A Lucrative Payday Could be Enjoyed by Chris Hollins and HCDP Chairwoman Lillie Schechter’s Father

AUBREY R. TAYLOR REPORTS©

What’s going on in Harris County, Texas? Have you heard the name Richard Schechter before? Well, if not, I’m sure that you heard the name Lillie Schechter before – right? If not, Lillie Schechter is the Chairman of the Harris County Democratic Party. Attorney Richard Schecter is Lillie Schechter’s father. Currently, Attorney Richard Schechter’s office is located at One Greenway Plaza, Suite #740 in Houston, Texas. And just for the record, Lillie Schechter’s Consultant Firm is located at One Greenway Plaza in Houston, Texas. What’s interesting about this? Well, The Law Offices of Richard Schechter, P.C. and the Hollins Law Group P.L.L.C. are two of the law firms that were approved by Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo back on Tuesday, July 30, 2019, to provide “PROFESSIONAL SERVICES” for Harris County as “SPECIAL COUNSEL” in a legal matter that’s still pending. Attorney Richard Schechter, the father of Harris County Democratic Party Chair Lillie Schechter, along with Attorney Christopher Hollins, Attorney Earnest W. Wotring, and Attorney Joanne Cicala where hired by Harris County to act as “SPECIAL COUNSEL” in connection with a lawsuit to recover damages that the county believes it suffered as a result of its purchase or reimbursement of insulin and other claims that the county can bring as a result of violations of consumer protection statutes, unfair trade practices statutes, restraint of trade, fraud, illegal conduct, and violations of any other state or federal rules, regulations, or statutes or any other causes of action permitted at or in equity. 


Attorney Richard Schechter, pictured above with his daughter, Harris County Democratic Party Chairwoman Lillie Schechter, has been licensed to practice law in the State of Texas since Monday, November 12, 1979. Comparatively speaking Attorney Christopher Hollins was licensed to practice law in the State of Texas since Thursday, May 1, 2014. So, why would two attorneys with such a tremendous gap in experience be paid the same hourly rate of $900.00 on a contingency basis? Again, please make a mental note that Attorney Richard Schechter is the father of Harris County Democratic Party Chairwoman Lillie Schechter and that Attorney Christopher Hollins is the vice-chair of finance for the Texas Democratic Party.

AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS
957 NASA PARKWAY #251
HOUSTON, TEXAS 77058-3039
PHONE: (832)212-8735
CELL: (281)788-3033



According to an article, I read the other day that was published on the Lawyers Mutual website, back in 2018, the “TOP 10” average rates of attorneys in cities across America are as follows:

1. New York City $344

2. Los Angeles $324

3. Chicago $312

4. Miami $310

5. Washington DC $304

6. Dallas $300

7. Atlanta $293

8. Boston $278

9. Houston $276

10. Philadelphia $245


So, if the average rate of attorneys in Houston, Texas is $276.00, how in the world could the Hollins Law Group PLLC be hired to represent Harris County in a legal matter at a “reasonable hourly rate” of $900.00 per hour -- the lead attorney for the firm only has 5 years of experience? Doesn't something smell fishy here? What's really going on in Harris County, Texas these days?



Christopher Hollins, a Democratic Party insider was chosen to serve as the interim-Harris County Clerk for the upcoming Tuesday, July 14, 2020, primary runoffs, and Tuesday, November 3, 2020, general election.

New County Clerk Has Potentially Lucrative Legal Contract with Harris County


Tuesday night, during another marathon session of Harris County Commissioners Court, Commissioners voted on party lines to appoint local attorney Christopher Hollins as interim county clerk. Hollins will take office on June 1, filling the vacancy left by Diane Trautman’s abrupt resignation. According to media reports, Hollins has pledged not to seek election to the office this November.

The decision to appoint Hollins- especially with the understanding that he won’t be running for the office- struck me as a peculiar one. I had assumed that Commissioners would look inside the office for a caretaker County Clerk. With runoff elections quickly approaching and the ongoing situation with COVID-19 continuing to cause uncertainty about how the elections will be conducted, I figured that they would look to somebody who wouldn’t have a learning curve and was already familiar with the functions and operations of the office. I was wrong.

Hollins is a personal injury attorney (his law firm website boasts of having “secured $11.1 million for our clients in 2019 alone) and Texas Democratic Party official. Hollins’ social media and public records show that he’s also in the process of opening a sports bar in Northwest Harris County. Court records on file with the Harris County District Clerk indicate that Hollins has an active personal injury litigation docket with as many as 96 active cases on file in Harris County District Courts. He even filed a slip and fall lawsuit against Kroger on behalf of a client the day before his appointment as County Clerk was voted on by Commissioners Court.

However, it is Hollins’ representation of Harris County in Federal Court that really piqued my interest.



This past July, Harris County Commissioners Court voted to hire four law firms, including the Hollins Law Group, on a contingent-fee basis to represent the County in litigation alleging that Harris County overpaid for insulin as a result of a price-fixing scheme. Harris County’s lawsuit was filed in November and is currently pending.

Pursuant to the terms of their contract with Harris County and applicable provisions of the Texas Government Code, the lawyers hired by Harris County in this litigation will be paid the lesser of 35% of any funds recovered by the County in the litigation or an amount calculated by a formula that takes into account the number of hours worked by attorneys and legal staff on the matter multiplied by the hourly rate of the person doing the work. That amount is then multiplied by four. The purpose of this formula is to prevent lawyers working on a contingent-fee basis for a governmental entity from making an excessive windfall on a case that required relatively little work on their part.

Under section 2254.106(a) of the Texas Government Code, the hourly rate used in calculating this formula must be a “reasonable and the customary rate in the relevant locality for the type of work performed and on the relevant experience, demonstrated ability, and standard hourly billing rate, if any, of the person performing the work.”

Hollins’ base hourly rate in his contract with Harris County is an eye-popping $900 per hour which, when multiplied by four as part of the fee formula could potentially entitle Hollins to as much as $3,600 per hour for his work on behalf of Harris County.



At the time he was retained by Harris County, Hollins had been practicing law for just over 5 years. As an attorney in Harris County, I am not personally aware of any attorneys with just 5 years of experience that command a standard hourly billing rate of $900 per hour. It certainly is not anywhere near a reasonable and customary rate in the Houston area for an attorney with that level of experience.

In addition to questions surrounding the propriety of his alleged $900 “reasonable” hourly rate, Hollins’ appointment as County Clerk also brings into question whether he should be able to collect any fee at all.

Section 154.004(b) of the Texas Local Government Code prohibits a county from paying a salaried county officer “a fee or commission to the officer for the performance of a service by the officer.” It is unclear how, or if, this statute may apply to Hollins’ situation since he was not a county officer at the time he entered into his contract with Harris County and he will not likely be a county officer once any funds are recovered by the County in the litigation in which he represents the County.

Hollins can simply make this issue go away by voluntarily waiving any fee interest he may have in the litigation where he been retained by Harris County, but it is unknown if he will do so. Hollins should also assure the citizens of Harris County that his active litigation docket and business interests will not interfere will his ability to devote the significant time and energy necessary in effectively serving the public as County Clerk.


Mark McCaig is an attorney and Republican Precinct Chairman in Harris County. The article above was first published on the "BIG JOLLY POLITICS" website on Thursday, May 21, 2020.



Texas voters should be very careful and make sure that they stay up to date before requesting a mail-in ballot from the Harris County Clerk's Office. Harris County Commissioner Rodney Ellis is a powerful man. He is unquestionably the most powerful man of any color in Harris County, Texas right now. When you look at it, a strong argument could be made for him being labeled the most powerful man of color in the entire state of Texas. The former Democratic Party Primary Director, Sharon Laverne Fuller labeled him last week in a Facebook post as one of the top three most powerful men in the entire United States of America. However, I wouldn't put him in my list of the top three, but he is certainly in my list of the top five most powerful men in America. But, is Commissioner Rodney Ellis a good leader? Or is Commissioner Rodney Ellis a tyrant wreaking havoc and abusing his new-found power and authority? I guess it depends on who you ask. However, it's clear if anything other than a criminal indictment and Commissioner Ellis ending up behind bars will slow him down. Right now, he's like a mad scientist in his laboratory conjuring up a can of whip-ass for the Republicans on Tuesday, November 3, 2020. After all, with his cohorts Judge Lina Hidalgo, and Commissioner Adrian Garcia at his side, this man appears to be unstoppable. Can't you see the gleam in his eyes? Don't you see the smug look on his face? Can't you see that it's Commissioner Rodney Ellis who's running Harris County, Texas, and not County Judge Lina Hidalgo? But if they aren't careful, their push to gain a competitive advantage for Democrats by making "MAIL-BALLOTS" available to everyone could be their downfall. How? Well, be assured that "ELECTION INTEGRITY GROUPS" who will be aided by volunteer "PRIVATE INVESTIGATION FIRMS" are standing at the ready to try and send as many people as they can to jail. How? Since Harris County, Texas is the "GOLDEN PRIZE" as it pertains to Texas battleground counties, you can best believe that these groups are going to do everything in their power to, identify voters who apply for mail ballots and/or vote by mail in violation of the Texas Election Code. And once they identify the voters who cast "ILLEGAL ABSENTEE BALLOTS," those voters, along with the public officials or others who publicly encouraged those violations could be subject to criminal charges under the State’s racketeering statutes. In case you don't know, under Texas' racketeering statutes, voters and public officials encouraging violation of "TEXAS ELECTION CODE" could be indicted and tried in adjacent counties. For those of you who might not know, Texas Organized Crime Statute (Penal Code, Title 11, Chapter 71, Section 71.02) is a serious offense. So, I'm not a lawyer, but you don't have to be a lawyer to understand that there's something "FISHY GOING ON IN THIS 2020 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CYCLE" where the expansion of these mail-in ballots are concerned? So, please be careful, because racketeering is a violation of federal laws and the laws that govern the state of Texas as well. Some folks are going to balk at this notion, but when you couple what's going on right now, with the information that has already been sent from the Secretary of State to the Texas Attorney General regarding "ABSENTEE BALLOT HARVESTING" in Harris County, the entire scope of this mail-in ballot crap is assuredly going to widen. After all, people are seriously profiting from politics, so it would not be surprising at all, to see this thing move out of the realm of "ELECTION RELATED CRIMES" and over into what's considered as "ORGANIZED CRIME" in my opinion. Especially when you see some of our local politicians using "MOB-LKE TACTICS" to silence their critics and allegedly intimidate their opponents and anyone else who opposes their regime. 

State Racketeering Charges Could Lie Ahead for Public Officials, Others who Publicly Encourage Voters to Cast Mail Ballots Illegally Before Mail-In Ballot Litigation is Settled in the Courts

AUBREY R. TAYLOR REPORTS©

You had better have your head on a swivel if you are under the age of 65 years old, and planning to use the Coronavirus COVID-19 Pandemic as your reasoning for doing so. Look, guys, racketeering could come into play here. And in case you don't know, racketeering is the criminal act of engaging in illegal business or, from what I understand, other acts run as part of organized crime. In case you don't know, from what we are seeing play out in Harris County, it would not be too much of a stretch to say that the "LIKE-MINDED CRIMINAL ORGANIZATION" portion of the RICO (Racketeer-Influenced and Corrupt Organization) law could be describing some of the recent political activities we've seen go down in Harris County, Texas. Especially with all of the money that's changing hands, and all of the folks who are colluding together to make the whole thing work.

AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS
957 NASA PARKWAY #251
HOUSTON, TEXAS 77058-3039
PHONE: (832)212-8735
CELL: (281)788-3033


VOTERS SHOULD BE CAREFUL

In case you haven’t heard, a federal appeals court temporarily blocked the vote-by-mail expansion that was approved by Federal Judge Biery. Yes, you heard me right. A panel of the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals saw fit to put on hold the ruling of Federal Judge Biery that would have allowed all voters in the State of Texas to request mail-in ballots during the upcoming Tuesday, July 14, 2020, primary runoffs, as well as the Tuesday, November 3, 2020, general election. In short, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals agreed with Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton yesterday and blocked Judge Biery’s ruling. Thus, preventing his ruling from taking effect so that the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals Justices can consider whether they should issue an injunction that would nullify his injunction during the entire appeals process. Yes, there’s a judicial tug-of-war going on in the State of Texas. But if you are a voter who is under the age of 65 you had better be paying close attention to what’s happening. Why, because whether you will be able to vote by mail has been on again and off again over the last few weeks. And according to the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals’ ruling on yesterday, only voters 65 years of age or older can qualify for a mail-in ballot, with the exception being people under the age of 65 years of age if they cite a disability or illness. Others who will be allowed to cast a mail-in ballot, as a result of the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling are those voters who will be out of the county during the election period and those who are confined in jail behind bars. 

CONSEQUENCES TO ELLIS’ ACTIONS

To every action there’s a reaction – right? Well, if the resolution proposed by Harris County Precinct One Commissioner Rodney Ellis as “AGENDA ITEM #18” at the recent Commissioner’s Court meeting is passed when he brings it back up in a few weeks the following consequence could very well be likely.

ELECTION RESULTS WILL BE DELAYED

Harris County, Texas had better be prepared to have election results delayed significantly if Commissioner Rodney Ellis gets his way. From the way I see it, the reporting of election results of any election affected by Commissioner Rodney Ellis’ resolution will be delayed because of the higher percentage of mail-in ballots that would have to be processed. In case you don’t know, earlier this Spring it took the State of Ohio nearly two full months to finally report the results of its primary election where the 100% mail-in ballot process was used. So, bringing it closer to home, the results of the upcoming Tuesday, November 3, 2020, general election may not even be available in Harris County, Texas until perhaps some time in early to mid-January if Commissioner Rodney Ellis gets his way. Has Commissioner Rodney Ellis or anyone else in the county shared this information with you? Huh? Have they told you this very important news related to the expansion of mail-in ballot voting in Harris County?

RESULTS COULD BE DELAYED FURTHER

You can bet your bottom dollar that there’s going to be several litigated election challenges in Texas for violations of the Texas Elections Code in my opinion. If this happens, the results of the Tuesday, November 3, 2020, general election will be further delayed if Commissioner Ellis gets his way. Has Commissioner Rodney Ellis or anyone in the county shared this important bit of information with you? Has anyone told you that there’s a very high likelihood that Harris County would more than likely bear the added expense of re-conducting the election if this were to occur?

VOTERS HAD BETTER BE CAREFUL

Voters had better be paying close attention to what’s going on with this litigation. Why? Well, I know you’ve heard the saying, “ignorance of the law is no excuse” before – right? If not, you had better know your rights as it relates to whether or not you can vote by mail-in ballot or not for yourself. Why? Well, your freedom could depend on it! And nope, I’m not joking around here. But don’t shoot me, because I am only the messenger. But you can rest assured in knowing that “ELECTION INTEGRITY GROUPS” who more than likely be aided by “PRIVATE INVESTIGATION FIRMS” will be working around the clock to identify voters who apply for mail-in ballots, and/or vote by mail in violation of the Texas Election Code in my opinion. So, again, I’m imploring my readers to not play “FOLLOW THE LEADER” with your freedom. DO YOUR RESEARCH, and stay on top of what’s going on. Look, any voter, along with any public officials or other folks who publicly encourage Texas voters to break the law by casting an illegal mail-in ballot could face criminal charges under the State’s racketeering statutes. And in case you don’t know, these same voters and public officials who are found to violate these statutes of the Texas Election Code would not be tried in Harris County, Texas according to my understanding. These violators would be indicted and tried in adjacent counties. 

THINGS ARE ALREADY BAD

In case you’ve been under a rock somewhere, more than likely, you should already know that Harris County as already developed a pretty bad reputation whereas elections are concerned – especially under the current administration. But things appear to get worse by day. And on top of that, things could get exponentially worse, being the Commissioner Rodney Ellis and others have chosen a relatively in-experienced “DEMOCRATIC PARTY INSIDER” to take over for Dr. Diane Trautman once her retirement becomes official on Sunday, May 31, 2020. Even still, every voter in the State of Texas has better understand that the Texas Constitution “DOES NOT” let each “TEXAS COUNTY” write its election code!!! That being said, the resolution that’s being considered by Commissioner Rodney Ellis and others, on its face, at least, appears to be an attempt to re-write election code. But, hey, at the end of the day, I hope I’m wrong. Why? Well, at the end of the day, If Commissioner Rodney Ellis and his cohorts are trying to re-write election code, the consequences for these Harris County public officials, and the voters who follow their guidance could turn out to be quite serious. So once, again, I implore ever Harris County voter to do your research and due diligence whereas these freaking mail-in ballots are concerned.

AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS
957 NASA PARKWAY #251
HOUSTON, TEXAS 77058-3039
PHONE: (832)212-8735
CELL: (281)788-3033



If you believe that President Donald J. Trump is the candidate who best represents your ideals, beliefs, and interests you should cast your vote for him on Tuesday, November 3, 2020. And remember that voting is a personal decision, and you do not have to be afraid to cast your ballot for the candidate of your choice in the race for President of the United States on Election Day!



If you believe that Senator Joe Biden is the candidate who best represents your ideals, beliefs, and interests you should cast your vote for him on Tuesday, November 3, 2020. And remember that voting is a personal decision, and you do not have to be afraid to cast your ballot for the candidate of your choice in the race for President of the United States on Election Day! 

AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS
957 NASA PARKWAY #251
HOUSTON, TEXAS 77058-3039
PHONE: (832)212-8735
CELL: (281)788-3033

AUBREY R. TAYLOR: "The listings below will better help you understand how "ILLEGAL ELECTION ACTIVITY" is impacting elections across all across the State of Texas."


"The information compiled below was pulled together by The Heritage Foundation. According to their website, The mission of The Heritage Foundation is to formulate and promote conservative public policies based on the principles of free enterprise, limited government, individual freedom, traditional American values, and a strong national defense. Some folks are trying to make a big deal out of me publishing this information. However, those folks can go to hell. My reader base is non-partisan and the information published below shows how big a problem we're dealing with as it relates to voter fraud in America. That being said, who cares who pulled the information together."

AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS
957 NASA PARKWAY #251
HOUSTON, TEXAS 77058-3039
PHONE: (832)212-8735
CELL: (281)788-3033


Texas -- 2019

Charles Nathan Jackson, of Tarrant County, forged the name of a stranger, Mardene Hickerson, on an application for an early voting ballot. Jackson pleaded guilty to providing false information on a voting application, a felony, as part of a plea deal to avoid an enhancement for previous drug and theft offenses. He was sentenced to 10 days in jail and was given credit for time already served. -- Source

Texas -- 2018

Miguel Hernandez visited an elderly woman shortly before the 2017 Dallas City Council election, collected her blank absentee ballot, filled it out, and forged her signature before mailing it back. Hernandez was the first person arrested as part of a larger voter fraud investigation in the Dallas area, stemming from claims by elderly voters that someone was forging their signatures and the return of nearly 700 mail-in ballots all signed by the same witness using a fake name. Hernandez faced a felony illegal voting charge, but pleaded to a lesser misdemeanor offense of "method of returning the marked ballot." He was sentenced to 180 days in jail and given credit for time served. -- Source

Texas -- 2017

Tyron Davis, a former constable in Ellis County, Texas, was convicted of six counts of voter fraud for assisting nursing home residents with their mail-in ballots and voter registration applications without identifying his assistance on the ballot. He was also convicted of false identification as a peace officer for having pasted an image of his face onto the body of a peace officer for use on a flier advertising his assistance at the nursing home during his campaign, all before he became an officer. Davis resigned his officer's license to avoid jail time. -- Source

Texas -- 2016

Prosecutors charged Graciela Sanchez with four misdemeanor counts of violating election law in an effort to assist Guadalupe Rivera to win re-election to the post of Weslaco city commissioner in 2013. Rivera and Sanchez were found to have illegally "assisted" absentee ballot voters. The results of the election were disputed, and a judge determined that 30 ballots had been illegally cast in an election decided by only 16 votes. Sanchez pleaded guilty and received two years' probation. -- Source


Texas -- 2016

Guadalupe Rivera, a former Weslaco city commissioner, pleaded guilty to one count of providing illegal "assistance" to a voter by filling out an absentee ballot "in a way other than the way the voter directed or without direction from the voter." The fraud took place during Rivera's 2013 re-election bid, which he won by a scant 16 votes. His challenger sued alleging fraud, and a judge determined that 30 ballots had been illegally cast, enough to alter the outcome of the election. A new election was subsequently held, and Rivera lost. Rivera originally faced 16 election-related charges, 15 of which were dropped as part of his plea deal. He was sentenced to one year of probation and ordered to pay a $500 fine. -- Source

Texas -- 2015

Following an investigation by the Texas Attorney General's office, Margarita Rangel Ozuna was charged with engaging in election fraud, along with five others during the 2012 Democratic Primary runoff election. Ozuna pleaded guilty to charges of fraudulent use of absentee ballots and was sentenced to serve 15 days in Cameron County jail and required to pay a $250 fine. This was the second time that Ozuna was convicted of voter fraud. In 2013, she was convicted of felony voter fraud stemming from the 2010 election. -- Source

Texas -- 2015

Following an investigation by the Texas Attorney General's office, Sara Virginia Perales was charged with engaging in election fraud, along with five others during the 2012 Democratic Primary runoff election. After admitting that she falsified absentee ballots, Perales entered into a deferred adjudication agreement. She was required to complete 12 months' probation and pay a $150 fine, in addition to being barred from engaging in voting activities. -- Source

Texas -- 2012

Gilda Hernandez pleaded guilty to two counts of unlawful assistance, two counts of illegal possession of a ballot, and two counts of failure to provide identifying information while assisting a voter. Hernandez was sentenced to one year of deferred adjudication and a $250 fine. -- Source

Texas -- 2010

Andrea Campos Bierstedt, a former member of the Freer City Council, was given pre-trial diversion after she was charged with illegally possessing a ballot belonging to another voter and "assisting" in filling it out. She was also ordered to pay a $3,500 donation to the county. -- Source

Texas -- 2010

Zaida Cantu Bueno, a politiquera in South Texas, pleaded guilty to absentee ballot fraud. Bueno was involved in vote-harvesting schemes in which she would illegally "assist" voters in filling out absentee ballots. Bueno received a 180-day suspended jail sentence and one year of probation and was ordered to complete 40 hours of community service and pay a $200 fine. -- Source

Texas -- 2010

Christina Lichtenberger pleaded guilty to illegally possessing an absentee ballot belonging to another voter and illegally "assisting" in filling it out. Lichtenberger received one year of deferred adjudication and was ordered to pay a $1,000 fine and court costs. -- Source

Texas – 2010 

Cynthia Lopez, of Live Oak County, pleaded guilty to one count of absentee ballot fraud after she unlawfully possessed other voters' absentee ballots in the 2008 primary election. She was sentenced to a 180-day suspended sentence, one year of probation, and was ordered to complete 40 hours of community service and pay a $200 fine. -- Source

Texas -- 2010

Norma Lopez, of Live Oak County, Texas, pleaded guilty to absentee ballot fraud after she unlawfully collected other voters' absentee ballots during the 2008 primary election. She was sentenced to a 180-day suspended jail sentence, one year of probation, and was ordered to complete 40 hours of community service and pay a $200 fine. -- Source

Texas -- 2010

Raul Pena Jr., Starr County Commissioner, pleaded no contest to misdemeanor charges that he illegally returned a marked ballot and that he mailed a ballot belonging to another vote. The charges stem from an incident in which Pena delivered 56 ballots to a local post office. Postal officials found it suspicious that Pena possessed so many ballots, yet none were signed by Pena as the law requires of those who assist voters. He was sentenced to six months of community supervision, received a 180 day suspended jail sentence, and was ordered to pay a $500 fine. -- Source

Texas – 2010

Alicia Pena Perez, a former Freer municipal judge, pleaded guilty to four counts of unlawful assistance and four counts of possession of a ballot. During the 2008 primary election, Perez took possession of ballots that did not belong to her and illegally prepared them. She received one year of probation and was ordered to pay a $1,000 fine plus court costs. -- Source

Texas -- 2009

Oralia Frausto was sentenced for his role in a scheme that involved registering fake voters to vacant lots during the 2006 Democratic Primary. The goal was to submit a large number of mail-in ballots. He received a pre-trial diversion. -- Source

Texas – 2009

Maria Gonzalez was sentenced for her role in a scheme that involved registering fake voters to vacant lots during the 2006 Democratic Primary. The goal was to submit a large number of mail-in ballots. She received pre-trial diversion. -- Source

Texas -- 2009

Guadalupe Rios pleaded guilty to eleven counts of illegally possessing a ballot without the voter's consent. She was sentenced to 60 days' house arrest, four years of probation, and was ordered to pay a $500 fine. -- Source

Texas -- 2008

Mark Littlefield, of Hays County, was charged with one count of illegal possession of a forged instrument stemming from forgery and document tampering conducted during a 2006 special election. He was admitted to a one-year pretrial diversion program and was ordered to make a $300 donation. -- Source

Texas -- 2008

Elva Gutierrez Lazo, a former Duval County precinct secretary, pleaded guilty to one count of illegally possessing another's ballot during the 2006 primary election. Lazo and others helped voters to register to receive absentee ballots by falsely claiming they were disabled. She later returned to collect and mail the absentee votes. Lazo received one year of deferred adjudication and one year of community supervision and was ordered to pay a $300 fine. -- Source

Texas -- 2008

Lydia Molina, then-Treasurer for Duval County, pleaded guilty to one count of illegally possessing another's ballot during the 2006 primary election. Molina and others helped voters to register to receive absentee ballots by falsely claiming they were disabled. She later returned to collect and mail the absentee votes. Molina received one year of deferred adjudication and one year of community supervision and was ordered to pay a $300 fine. -- Source

Texas -- 2008

Oscar Rios pleaded guilty to 12 counts of illegally possessing a ballot without a voter's consent. Rios was involved in a scheme to register phony voters at vacant lots in an effort to receive and submit a large number of mail-in ballots for the 2006 Democratic Primary. He was sentenced to two years of deferred adjudication, two years of community supervision, and was ordered to pay a $300 fine. -- Source

Texas – 2008

Maria Soriano, then-head of the Duval Welfare Department, pleaded guilty to one count of illegally possessing another's ballot during the 2006 primary election. Soriano and others helped voters register to receive absentee ballots by falsely claiming they were disabled. She later returned to collect and mail the absentee votes. Soriano received one year of deferred adjudication and one year of community supervision and was ordered to pay a $300 fine. -- Source

Texas – 2008

Maria Adelina Trigo, a former Duval County welfare clerk, pleaded guilty to one count of illegally possessing a ballot that was not her own during the 2006 primary election. Trigo and others helped voters to register to receive absentee ballots by falsely claiming they were disabled. Trigo later returned to collect and mail the absentee vote. She received one year of deferred adjudication and one year of community supervision and was ordered to pay a $300 fine. -- Source

Texas – 2007

Raymond Villarreal, the then-County Commissioner of Refugio, pleaded guilty to charges related to a scheme to rig the absentee vote in his favor during his 2006 primary race for commissioner. Villarreal first had registered voters request absentee ballots but then routed the ballots to known supporters who would vote for Villarreal. He then had the original applicants sign the ballots. He was sentenced to 90 days in the county jail and given five years of probation. He was also ordered to complete 300 hours of community service and pay $2,500 in fines. Villarreal was forced to resign. -- Source

Texas -- 2006

Virginia Ramos Garza, of Nueces County, was charged with four counts of "possessing an official ballot or carrier envelope of another." In a 2005 school district election, she targeted the elderly by going door-to-door to obtain votes, and then took the ballots to the post office for mailing. She was admitted into a one-year pretrial diversion program, which included 12 months of community supervision. Garza conspired to engage in vote harvesting with Elida Garza Flores, Isabel Rios Gonzalez, and Josefina Marinas Suarez, all of whom were charged and ultimately admitted into diversion programs or received deferred adjudications. -- Source

Texas -- 2006

Elida Garza Flores, of Nueces County, was charged with one count of "possessing of an official ballot or carrier envelope of another." In a 2005 school district election, she targeted the elderly by going door-to-door to obtain votes, and then took the ballots to the post office for mailing. She was admitted into a one-year pretrial diversion program, which included 12 months of community supervision. She conspired to engage in vote harvesting with Virginia Ramos Garza, Isabel Rios Gonzalez, and Josefina Marinas Suarez, all of whom were charged and ultimately admitted into diversion programs or received deferred adjudications. -- Source

Texas -- 2006

Isabel Rios Gonzalez, of Nueces County, entered a plea of nolo contendere to two counts of "possessing of an official ballot or carrier envelope of another." In a 2005 school district election, she targeted the elderly by going door-to-door to obtain votes, and then took the ballots to the post office for mailing. She was sentenced to one year of deferred adjudication, 12 months of community supervision, and was ordered to pay a $500 fine. She conspired to engage in vote harvesting with Virginia Ramos Garza, Elida Garza Flores, and Josefina Marinas Suarez, all of whom were charged and ultimately admitted into diversion programs or received deferred adjudications. -- Source

Texas -- 2006

Anita Baeza was given six months of pre-trial diversion after she was charged with five counts of illegally possessing another's ballot during the 2004 primary. -- Source

Texas – 2006

Willie Ray, a Texarkana Ward 2 City Councilwoman, and Jamillah Johnson pleaded guilty to fraudulent use of absentee ballots during the 2004 general election. The two women illegally assisted the elderly and other voters in submitting applications for mail-in ballots, then collected and mailed in the completed ballots for the voters. This assistance is a Class B misdemeanor under Texas law. The judge fined Willie Ray $200 and sentenced her to eight months of probation. Jamillah Johnson received a $200 fine and six months of probation. -- Source

Texas -- 2006

Melinda Hunter was indicted on seven counts of illegally possessing and transporting ballots not belonging to her. Hunter illegally assisted elderly voters in preparing their ballots. She was placed in a six-month pretrial diversion program. -- Source

Texas -- 2006

Josefina Marinas Suarez pleaded guilty to a charge of handling an official ballot belonging to another. During the 2005 Robstown school district election, Suarez targeted elderly voters, soliciting votes and returning the absentee ballots herself. Under Texas law, she was not permitted to handle or transport absentee ballots. Suarez was sentenced to one year of deferred adjudication probation and a $500 fine. -- Source

Texas -- 2006

Trinidad Villalobos was convicted by a jury of illegally possessing and transporting ballots belonging to multiple voters during the 2004 primary. According to witnesses, Villalobos offered to assist elderly voters to fill out applications for absentee ballots and would later collect and mail those ballots. Unauthorized possession of ballots is a misdemeanor under Texas law. Villalobos received six months of probation for each charge. -- Source

Texas -- 2005

Melva Kay Ponce was convicted for mailing in an absentee ballot for her deceased mother in the November 2004 general election. She pleaded guilty to one charge of illegal voter registration and was sentenced to two years of deferred adjudication and ordered to pay a $1,500 fine. -- Source

Texas -- 2005

Johnny Wayne Akers, of Hardeman County, was charged with six counts of "possession of an official ballot or carrier envelope of another" for engaging in vote harvesting activities during a 2004 primary election in Texas. He pleaded guilty to possession of an official ballot and was sentenced to two years of probation and ordered to pay a $2,000 fine. -- Source



AUBREY R. TAYLOR: "The listings below will better help you understand how "ILLEGAL ELECTION ACTIVITY" is impacting elections across the United States America."


"The information compiled below was pulled together by The Heritage Foundation. According to their website, The mission of The Heritage Foundation is to formulate and promote conservative public policies based on the principles of free enterprise, limited government, individual freedom, traditional American values, and a strong national defense. Some folks are trying to make a big deal out of me publishing this information. However, those folks can go to hell. My reader base is non-partisan and the information published below shows how big a problem we're dealing with as it relates to voter fraud in America. That being said, who cares who pulled the information together."

AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS
957 NASA PARKWAY #251
HOUSTON, TEXAS 77058-3039
PHONE: (832)212-8735
CELL: (281)788-3033


New Mexico -- 2020

Dyon Hererra, of Espanola, conspired with Laura Seeds to falsify absentee ballots in support of Seeds' husband's candidacy for mayor in 2016. Hererra forged the signatures of his grandparents on absentee ballots. The candidate that he cast the ballots in favor of won the race by two votes. Herrera was charged with conspiracy to violate the municipal election code of Espanola, a fourth-degree felony, and pleaded guilty. He was sentenced to 18 months of probation. -- Source

New Mexico -- 2020

Laura Seeds, of Espanola, conspired with Dyon Herrera to falsify several absentee ballots in favor of Seeds' husband, a city councilman who was running for mayor in 2016. Seeds was charged with two counts of making false statements relative to the municipal election code, one count of conspiracy to violate the municipal election code, and ten counts of possession of another person's absentee ballot. Seeds was found guilty of two counts of making false statements relative to the municipal election code and two counts of possession of another person's absentee ballot, which are all fourth-degree felonies. She was sentenced to six months of house arrest, followed by five years of supervised probation. -- Source

North Carolina – 2019

A general election for the seat in the Ninth Congressional district was decertified by North Carolina State Board of Elections after credible allegations of absentee ballot abuse arose. Officials became suspicious when 61% of the vote-by-mail ballots were cast for the Republican candidate, despite the fact that only 16% of the mail-by-ballot were registered Republicans. Multiple people, including the Republican candidate’s son, expressed their suspicions that a political contractor illegally organized the collection of absentee ballots and completed empty mail-in ballots. The Board of Elections ordered a new election to fill the seat and the contractor was subsequently indicted. -- Source

Alabama -- 2019

Elbert Melton, the former mayor of Gordon, illegally notarized two ballots, without witnesses present, during the 2016 election in which he was running for mayor. Melton won that race by only 16 votes. Melton was convicted on two counts of absentee ballot fraud, was removed from office, and was sentenced to serve one year in prison followed by two years of probation. -- Source

Oregon -- 2019

Marjory Gale, of Hood River, voted twice in the 2016 election, once for herself and once for her daughter. Both votes were cast by absentee ballot. Gale pleaded guilty to a violation and was ordered to pay a $750 fine. -- Source

New Hampshire -- 2018

A woman filled out her late husband's absentee ballot for the 2016 general election, claiming he had done so prior to his death. She was given a $500 civil penalty. Her case was included in an official report compiled by New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner and other state election officials, but her name was redacted. -- Source

Connecticut -- 2018

Troy Stevenson was convicted of making a false statement on an absentee ballot as well as second-degree forgery, both class D felonies. He committed this crime on October 28, 2017, in connection with the November 2017 mayoral election in Stafford. Stevenson was given a three-year suspended sentence. -- Source

Connecticut -- 2018

Betty Chappell was convicted of making a false statement on an absentee ballot as well as second-degree forgery, both class D felonies. She committed this crime on October 28, 2017, in connection with the November 2017 mayoral election in Stafford. Chappell received a five-year suspended sentence. -- Source

Florida -- 2018

Bret Warren, of Casselberry, entered a plea of nolo-contendere to two third-degree felony voter fraud charges. Warren's fraud was uncovered when five residents of Altamonte Springs noted they had not received their absentee ballots for the 2016 presidential election. The ballots had nonetheless been returned and were filled out and signed. Investigators matched fingerprints on the envelope to Warren through a federal database, and DNA obtained from the envelope also matched Warren. Warren was charged with two counts of felony false swearing in connection with voting or elections, and after pleading nolo-contendere was sentenced to 154 days' imprisonment with credit for time served, and ordered to pay $468 in fees and court costs. -- Source

Oklahoma -- 2018

Ronald Henry, a 2015 candidate for trustee in Luther, Oklahoma, brought several absentee ballots to be notarized by Mayor Cecilia Taft. It is illegal for a ballot to be notarized without the person signing being present. Ronald Henry entered an Alford plea to the charges and received a five-year deferred sentence. -- Source

Virginia -- 2018

Richard Douglas Dohmen, of James City County, committed voter fraud when he attempted to cast ballots for both himself and his dead wife in a 2018 state election. Dohmen was charged with forging public records and making false statements on required forms and pleaded guilty to making false statements on required forms. He was sentenced to 1 year in the penitentiary, 3 years of unsupervised probation, and was ordered to pay a $458 fine. -- Source

Florida -- 2017

Former Eatonville Mayor Anthony Grant was convicted of a felony voting fraud charge, a felony election violation, and misdemeanor absentee voting violations. During the 2015 election, while he was running for election, he coerced absentee voters to cast ballots for him. In at least one case, Grant personally solicited an absentee vote from a non-resident of Eatonville. Grant, who had previously served as mayor, lost the in-person vote, but still won the election with more than twice the number of absentee ballots than were cast for incumbent Bruce Mount. Following his indictment, Grant was suspended by Florida Governor Rick Scott. He was sentenced to 400 hours of community service and four years' probation. -- Source

Florida -- 2017

Mia Antoinette Nowells, a campaign worker for former Eatonville Mayor Anthony Grant, was found guilty of coercing Layota Jackson to vote for Grant in the 2015 election. Nowells was charged with intimidating voters and tampering with absentee ballots. She was sentenced to two years' probation and 200 hours of community service. -- Source

Colorado -- 2017

Toni Lee Newbill pleaded guilty to voting twice using her deceased father's name to do so, once in the 2013 general election and again in the Republican primary of 2016. Newbill was sentenced to 18 months of unsupervised probation and 30 hours of community service and was ordered to pay a $500 fine and additional court fees. -- Source

Illinois -- 2017

Steveland Kidd pleaded guilty to two counts of violating absentee ballots during a municipal election in April 2013. Kidd took possession of and delivered, an absentee ballot to election authorities despite not being legally allowed to do so. The crime is a Class Three felony. Kidd was sentenced to 12 days in the St. Clair County Jail and is now barred from engaging in campaign-related activities or electioneering. -- Source

Illinois -- 2017

Brian McDouglar, a resident of Cahokia, Illinois, was sentenced to two years in prison on charges of falsifying or tampering with an absentee ballot, a class 3 felony. McDouglar illegally took an absentee ballot from a voter he was not related to and then placed that ballot in the mail. -- Source

Iowa -- 2017

Terri Lynn Rote attempted to vote twice in the 2016 presidential election. Rote cited fears that the election was rigged to justify her attempt to cast two absentee votes for Donald Trump. Rote was arrested attempting to cast the second ballot. She pleaded guilty to a felony charge of election misconduct, and was sentenced to two years of probation and ordered to pay a $750 fine. -- Source

Alabama -- 2017

Brandon Dean, who was elected mayor of Brighton, Alabama in 2016, was ordered to vacate the office after a judge determined that 46 fraudulent absentee votes had been cast for him in the 2016 election. Of these ballots, 21 were not signed by the voter, 22 had been sent to Dean's address instead of the voters' homes, 2 absentee ballots were submitted by voters who were actually present at city hall on Election Day, and one did not live in Brighton city limits. Deducting the fraudulent votes dropped Dean's vote total below the threshold needed to avoid a mandatory runoff, which the city of Brighton must now hold. -- Source

New Jersey -- 2017

Melvin Howell, of Asbury Park, pleaded guilty to a fourth-degree felony charge after she filled out applications for nonexistent voters in a local school board election. According to the Union County Clerk, at least 54 ballots were tainted with irregularities. Howell was sentenced to one year of probation. -- Source

Colorado -- 2017

Sarilu Sosa-Sanchez voted twice in the 2013 election, once in her own name and once in the name of her late mother. Sosa-Sanchez pleaded guilty to a felony forgery charge after admitting she forged her late mother's signature on a ballot. She also pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor double voting charge. Sosa-Sanchez was sentenced to 60 hours of community service, was ordered to pay restitution and court fees, and will help the clerk and recorder's office educate other residents about the consequences of voter fraud. -- Source

Minnesota -- 2017

Michelle Marie Landsteiner forged the signature and voted for a family member during the 2016 Minnesota primary. However, the family member had already registered to vote elsewhere, and her ballot was flagged. Upon review, the voter's signature and the witness's signature looked extremely similar. Landsteiner pled guilty to unlawful voting and was sentenced to one year of probation and nearly $600 in fees. A 90-day jail sentence will be waived after completing her probation. -- Source

Alabama -- 2017

A judge overturned the preliminary election results and declared Lewis Washington as the winner in a contested Wetumpka City Council District 2 election. On election night, it appeared that Washington's opponent, Percy Gill, who was the incumbent, had won by three votes. Washington challenged the result, and following a trial in which live witnesses and forensics experts testified, the judge threw out eight absentee ballots that had been cast for Gill either because the signatures had been forged or they had not been notarized or signed in front of the requisite number of witnesses, and declared Washington to be the winner. -- Source

Indiana -- 2017

Max Judson was convicted of election fraud and witness tampering during the 2014 primary election. While a candidate for the city council during the election, he admitted that he solicited someone he knew not to be a resident of the district to cast an absentee ballot. He also admitted that when he realized he was being investigated, he attempted to intervene and deter the voter from communicating with law enforcement. He was sentenced to one year and one day in prison in addition to one year of supervised release and a $500 fine. He was also forced to resign from his seat on the Sullivan County Council. -- Source

Colorado -- 2017

Steven Curtis, the former head of the Colorado Republican Party, was charged with a misdemeanor election mail-in ballot offense, as well as one count of forgery of a public record. It was revealed through handwriting analysis that Curtis forged his ex-wife's name on her ballot and mailed it in. He was found guilty and sentenced to four-year probation and 300 hours of community service. -- Source

Illinois -- 2016

Audrey Cook, a Madison County election judge, sent in a ballot marked for Donald Trump in the 2016 election on behalf of her recently deceased husband. She pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of attempted violation of the election code in exchange for dropping a felony perjury charge. -- Source

Alabama -- 2016

Daniel W. Reynolds pleaded guilty to three counts of absentee ballot fraud and was sentenced to two years' probation. Reynolds, the chief campaign volunteer for Commissioner Amos Newsome, participated in falsifying absentee ballots in the Dothan District 2 election between Newsome and his rival Lamesa Danzey in the summer of 2013. -- Source

Indiana -- 2016

Lowell "Ross" Colen, a 10-year veteran of the Rising Sun Police Department, was forced to resign after pleading guilty to four counts of felony voter fraud. Colen was accused of illegally trying to help his father win election to the Rising Sun City Council by completing absentee voter applications and filling out ballots for people who were not eligible to vote in the county, and in some cases forging signatures. Colen evidently conducted some of this illegal activity while in uniform and on duty. He pleaded guilty to four counts of felony vote fraud and was sentenced to concurrently serve one year in prison and 185 days' probation. -- Source

New Hampshire -- 2016

Nancy Sullivan, a resident of Windham, admitted having committed voter fraud in the 2014 general election. Sullivan fraudulently obtained an absentee ballot in the name of her son, Avery Galloway, by forging his signature on an absentee ballot request form, as well as on the envelope containing the completed ballot. Sullivan avoided criminal prosecution and the permanent loss of her ability to vote by paying a fine as a civil penalty and signing a consent agreement with the Attorney General. -- Source

New York -- 2016

Ana Cuevas, a campaign aide for Hector Ramirez, pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct after she and other staff went door to door tricking potential voters into signing absentee ballot applications. They then took the applications to the Board of Elections, retrieved the absentee ballots, and voted for Ramirez without the voters' knowledge. Cuevas was sentenced to a conditional discharge. -- Source

New York -- 2016

Hector Ramirez pleaded guilty to one count of criminal possession of a forged instrument. Ramirez, a 2014 State Assembly Candidate for the 86th District Assembly District, deceived voters into giving their absentee ballots to his campaign on the false premise that the campaign would then submit the ballots. Instead, Ramirez's campaign inserted his name on at least thirty-five of the absentee ballots. Ramirez initially won the 2014 race, but a recount determined he had lost by two votes. In lieu of jail time, Bronx Supreme Court Justice Steven Barrett imposed a three-year ban on Ramirez running for office. Ramirez could face jail time if he runs for office in violation of his three-year ban. Prior to his guilty plea, Ramirez unsuccessfully ran for the same state assembly seat on numerous occasions, most recently in the 2016 election. -- Source

Alabama -- 2015

Janice Lee Hart pleaded guilty to eight misdemeanor counts of attempted absentee ballot fraud in connection with misconduct while working on the 2013 campaign for District 2 City Commissioner Amos Newsome. Prosecutors charged that Hart was not present when absentee ballots were signed even though she was listed as a witness on the ballots. In the election, Newsome defeated his challenger by only 14 votes and received 119 out of the 124 absentee ballots cast. A judge sentenced Hart to 12 months in the county jail for each count, which he suspended to two years of probation for each count. -- Source

Alabama -- 2015

A Houston County jury found Lesa Coleman guilty of seven felony counts of absentee ballot fraud related to the 2013 election for a city commission seat. Coleman received a three-year split sentence. She will serve 180 days in jail followed by three years of probation. -- Source

Alabama -- 2015

Olivia Lee Reynolds was convicted of 24 counts of voter fraud. While working on the 2013 campaign for her boyfriend, Dothan City Commissioner Amos Newsome, Reynolds filled out voters' ballots for them and told others for whom to vote. Her fraud had definite consequences: Commissioner Newsome won reelection by a mere 14 votes, losing the in-person vote by a wide margin but winning an incredible 96 percent of the absentee vote. Newsome himself faced pressure to resign as a consequence. Reynolds was sentenced to serve six months in a community corrections facility. She is appealing the conviction. -- Source

Pennsylvania -- 2015

Eugene Gallagher pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor charges in connection with the November 2013 election, in which he was a candidate for councilman in the Taylor Borough. He unlawfully persuaded Taylor residents and non-residents to register for absentee ballots in the election using a Taylor address. Gallagher was the top vote-getter in the election and won his first term as councilman. With his guilty plea, Gallagher can no longer hold public office. A judge sentenced him to a maximum of 10 months in jail and two months of house arrest for both his election fraud conviction and a DUI conviction. He was also sentenced to more than five years of court supervision and 200 hours of community service. -- Source

Illinois – 2015

Brian McDouglar was convicted of falsifying or tampering with an absentee ballot. He was sentenced to two years in prison for the Class C felony. -- Source

Kentucky -- 2014

Ruth Robinson, the former mayor of Martin, Kentucky, was sentenced to 90 months' imprisonment on a variety of charges that included vote buying, identity theft, and fraud. With specific regard to the election charges, Robinson and co-conspirators James "Red" Robinson (her husband) and James Steven Robinson (her son) threatened and intimidated residents of Martin in the run-up to the 2012 election in which Robinson was seeking re-election. The cabal targeted residents living in public housing or in properties Robinson owned, threatening them with eviction if they did not sign absentee ballots the Robinsons had already filled out. Robinson also targeted disabled residents and offered to buy the votes of others. "Red" Robinson was sentenced to 40 months in prison, and his son James Steven Robinson received a total of 31 months' imprisonment. -- Source

Illinois -- 2014

Augustus Stacker, Jr., of Belleville, Illinois, pleaded guilty to a felony charge of a violation of absentee ballots. He assisted in manipulating up to 27 fraudulent absentee ballots in a municipal election. Stacker was sentenced to 18 months of conditional discharge and required to pay court costs. -- Source

Michigan -- 2014

Salim Ahmed pleaded guilty to one felony count of unlawful possession of an absentee ballot. Ahmed was initially charged with 20 counts of improper return of absentee ballots. He and two other men delivered absentee ballots to the city clerk's office from people not related to them or members of their household. Ahmed was fined and ordered to pay court costs. -- Source

Michigan -- 2014

Armani Asad, an unsuccessful candidate for Hamtramck City Council, pleaded guilty to one count of improper possession of an absentee ballot. Asad initially faced 14 charges related to the improper return of absentee ballots. He and two other men illegally delivered absentee ballots to the city clerk's office from people not related to them or members of their household. Asad was fined and ordered to pay court costs. -- Source

Michigan -- 2014

Russell Mohammed pleaded guilty to one felony count of unlawful possession of an absentee ballot. Mohammed was initially charged with six counts of improper return of absentee ballots. He and two other men were charged with delivering absentee ballots to the city clerk's office from people not related to them or members of their household. Mohammed was fined and ordered to pay court costs. -- Source

Michigan -- 2014

Mohammed Abdur Rahman, of Hamtramck, pleaded guilty to one count of improper possession of an absentee ballot. He initially faced five counts of improper possession of ballots during the 2013 primary election. He was sentenced to probation. -- Source

New Jersey -- 2014

Eleven individuals were arrested in a state investigation of possible manipulation of absentee ballots in the election of Paterson Councilman Rigo Rodriguez. They entered into pre-trial intervention, a probationary program, to avoid trial and possible prison time. -- Source

New Jersey -- 2014

Former Paterson Councilman Rigo Rodriguez and his wife were entered into the Pre-Trial Intervention Program after facing charges of conspiracy, election fraud, mail-in ballot fraud, and witness tampering. Paterson and his wife, who managed his campaign, orchestrated a scheme to take possession of absentee ballots and "assist" voters in filling them out, or fill them out fraudulently. Rodriguez instructed his volunteers to lie to officials investigating his scheme. -- Source

New York -- 2014

William McInerney, John Brown, Anthony DeFiglio, and Anthony Renna pleaded guilty to felony charges, having forged signatures on absentee ballots during the 2009 Working Families Party primary. Sentences: John Brown, six months' imprisonment; Anthony DeFiglio, 100 hours' community service; Anthony Renna, 200 hours in the work-order program; William McInerney, 90 days in the work-order program. -- Source

North Carolina -- 2014

When her husband passed away, Verna Roehm decided to honor his last request--to vote for Mitt Romney in the 2012 election. Months after his death, Mrs. Roehm filled out and submitted an absentee ballot in her husband's name. The illegal vote was caught after the election during an audit by election officials; when confronted about the irregularity, Mrs. Roehm admitted to casting the vote. Recognizing the unusual circumstances of the case, the judge convicted Roehm of a misdemeanor rather than a felony. She received no jail time. -- Source

Pennsylvania -- 2014

The former police chief of Harmar Township pleaded guilty to illegally soliciting absentee ballots to benefit his wife and her running mate in the 2009 Democratic primary for town council. Toney applied for the ballots and then had them filled out illegally by individuals not expected to be absent on election day. The absentee ballot count flipped the primary results, securing a victory for Mrs. Toney's running mate. During the subsequent FBI investigation, Mr. Toney attempted to prevent witnesses, including two grand jury witnesses, from testifying. Toney was sentenced to three years' probation. -- Source

Ohio – 2013

During the 2012 election, Russell Glassop obtained and submitted an absentee ballot in the name of his deceased wife. After Glassop pleaded guilty to absentee ballot fraud, the judge sentenced him to a diversion program. -- Source

Ohio -- 2013

Sister Marguerite Kloos pleaded guilty and resigned as the Dean of the Division of Arts and Humanities for The College of Mount St. Joseph's, after admitting that she cast an absentee ballot in the name of the late Sister Rose Marie Hewitt, who had died one month before the election. She was sentenced to a diversion program. -- Source

Ohio -- 2013 

Marian Wilson, from Grove City, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of illegal voting. Wilson voted twice in the 2010 general election, requesting and submitting two absentee ballots under two different names--Marian Wilson and Marian Toles. She was sentenced to one year of probation. -- Source

Connecticut -- 2013

The State Elections Enforcement Commission ruled that State Rep. Minnie Gonzalez was "knowingly present" while four voters fraudulently filled out absentee ballots at City Hall during the 2006 election. She was fined $4,500 by the Commission. Gonzalez appealed the fine but lost in the state Superior Court. -- Source

Florida – 2013

Deisy Cabrera pleaded guilty to charges of being an absentee ballot broker (boletera) as part of a massive absentee voter fraud scheme. Her notebook contained the names and addresses of over 500 voters who were mostly elderly Hispanics in Hialeah. The lists, titled Deisy's Voters, reportedly included information as to whether the voter was illiterate or was blind, deaf, or had Alzheimer's. She was sentenced to one year of probation. -- Source

Florida -- 2013

Chief of Staff to Florida Rep. Joe Garcia (D_26), Jeffrey Garcia, resigned and pleaded guilty to orchestrating a plot involving the submission of hundreds of fraudulent absentee-ballot requests during the primary in 2012. Garcia was sentenced to 90 days in prison and 18 months' probation. He was ordered to spend the first three months of probation under house arrest. -- Source

Illinois -- 2013

Pamela Bryant, of Cahokia, pleaded guilty to three counts of incorrectly marking an absentee ballot. She received probation. -- Source

Illinois -- 2013

Monica LaPlant, of Cahokia, was charged with incorrectly marking an absentee ballot in the 2013 election. She was given probation after pleading guilty. -- Source

Indiana -- 2013

Austin Mayor Doug Campbell faced voter fraud charges that he illegally accepted absentee ballots from voters and filled out a woman's incomplete ballot. He pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor electioneering in exchange for prosecutors agreeing to dismiss the felony voter fraud and conspiracy charges, which enabled him to remain in office. -- Source

Indiana -- 2013

Paul Etheridge, the former New Albany mayoral candidate in the Democratic primary, was charged with voter fraud for endorsing a ballot of someone he knew to be ineligible in the May 2011 Democratic mayoral primary in New Albany, Indiana. He pleaded guilty to Forgery of Official Ballot Endorsement and received a suspended 18-month sentence. -- Source

Indiana -- 2013

Michael Marshall, a Jennings County Democratic Party worker, pleaded guilty to three counts of vote fraud relating to applications for absentee ballots for his son, brother, and former roommate. Marshall was sentenced to 18 months in prison. -- Source

Iowa – 2013

Beth Ann Gallagher cast an absentee ballot in Iowa on behalf of her daughter, who had recently moved to Minnesota (and who also voted in Minnesota) in the 2012 election. Gallagher pleaded guilty to a false representation of records or process and paid a fine. -- Source

Maryland -- 2013

Elsie Virginia Schildt, of Frederick, pleaded guilty to attempting to vote more than once in the same election. She had attempted to submit an absentee ballot in her mother's name in the 2012 general election, despite the fact that her mother had died more than a month beforehand. She was sentenced to probation before judgment and required to perform 40 hours of community service. -- Source

Maryland –2013

Linda Earlette Wells pleaded guilty to impersonating a voter after she attempted to vote as her deceased mother. While she was a registered voter in Florida, Wells called the town where her mother had been registered, claimed to be her mother (who had passed away), and asserted that she had not, in fact, died. She then obtained an absentee ballot and attempted to vote in the 2012 presidential election. -- Source

Massachusetts -- 2013

Courtney Llewellyn, an East Longmeadow town employee, conspired with her husband to cast absentee ballots in her husband's race for state office. She changed the party registration of 285 registered Democrats to unaffiliated, and then requested Republican primary ballots for all of them. She and her husband took the ballots on the pretense of mailing them to the voters, but never did so. Llewellyn pleaded guilty to five charges including larceny, forgery, conspiracy, and interfering with an election official. She was sentenced to one year of probation. -- Source

New Hampshire -- 2013

Adam Kumpu of Milford was fined $1,000 and his mother, Janine Kumpu of Milford, was fined $250 for committing voter fraud in the 2012 election. Janine Kumpu obtained an absentee ballot in her son's name, and he used it to vote in Milford last November. He also voted in person in Keene. The 2012 election was the first one in which photo IDs were required for voting in New Hampshire. -- Source

Massachusetts -- 2012

Former State Representative Stephen Smith pleaded guilty to two counts of voter fraud in a scheme in which he obtained absentee ballots for ineligible voters and, in some cases, cast their ballots without their knowledge. He was sentenced to four months in prison, a year of supervised release, and ordered to pay a $20,000 fine. -- Source

Iowa -- 2012

Mark Evangelous was charged with violating absentee voting laws, uttering a false document, and forgery related to his submission of an absentee ballot application in the name of a deceased voter. Evangelous claimed he had input the name of his sister-in-law incorrectly. The absentee ballot charge was dismissed, and the judge continued his case without a finding for a year, ordering him to complete 200 hours of community service. -- Source

Indiana -- 2012

John Cook, of Jennings County, pleaded guilty to perjury after he was arrested in connection with absentee ballot fraud. He was sentenced to 545 days' imprisonment, with one year of that time suspended. -- Source

Indiana -- 2012

Joshua Clemons was charged with voter fraud for completing two absentee ballots for people he knew to be ineligible in the May 2011 Democratic Primary. He pleaded guilty to fraudulent delivery of ballots and received a suspended 18-month sentence. -- Source

Indiana -- 2012

Christopher Marshall, of Jennings County, pleaded guilty to deception in a case involving absentee ballot fraud. His father, Michael Marshall, was working on a mayoral re-election campaign and was responsible for soliciting absentee ballot voters. He recruited his son and another individual (John Cook) to assist him. Christopher Marshall was ordered to pay court costs and fees, a fine, and restitution totaling $212. --- Source

Florida -- 2012

Sergio Robaina (the uncle of former Hialeah mayor) was charged with illegally collecting absentee ballots, a misdemeanor, and with felony voter fraud charges for allegedly filling out a ballot against the wishes of two voters, one of them a woman with dementia. Robaina pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges of illegal possession of absentee ballots and was sentenced to one year of probation. -- Source

Arkansas -- 2012

Democratic Rep. Hudson Hallum, his father Kent Hallum, and two campaign workers, Phillip Wayne Carter and Sam Malone, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit election fraud. The lawmaker's campaign bribed absentee voters and destroyed ballots in the Arkansas District 54 primary, runoff, and general elections in 2011. Hudson Hallam was sentenced to one year of home detention, three years' probation, and was ordered to pay a $20,000 fine and complete 100 hours of community service. Kent Hallum received probation and nine months' home confinement. Sam Malone received three years' probation (7.2 months of which was home confinement), and 100 hours of community service. Carter received three years' probation (five months of which was monitored home confinement) 100 hours of community service, and a $2,500 fine. -- Source

California -- 2012

Officials in the small town of Cudahy took part in a widespread corruption scheme that included accepting cash bribes, abusing drugs at City Hall, and throwing out absentee ballots that favored election challengers. After a lengthy FBI Investigation of the 2007 and 2009 elections, the former head of code enforcement, Angel Perales, admitted to tampering with mail-in ballots in city elections by opening them and then resealing and submitting votes for incumbent candidates while discarding votes for challengers. He and Mayor David Silva pleaded guilty to bribery and extortion charges, although Perales' plea agreement included his admission of election fraud. Silva was sentenced to one year in federal prison. Perales was sentenced to five years' probation. -- Source

Colorado -- 2012

In 2012, Brittany Curtis pleaded guilty to attempting to influence a public servant when she forged signatures and voter information on a ballot petition. She was given a deferred sentence of two years and fined $1,653.50. -- Source

New Jersey -- 2012

John Fernandez, who worked for the Essex County Department of Economic Development, was convicted of election fraud, absentee ballot fraud, and forgery. Fernandez submitted phony absentee ballots while he was working on the 2007 election campaign of state Sen. Teresa Ruiz. Fernandez's scheme involved messenger ballots, which are used by voter’s home-bound by illness or a disability. Fernandez fraudulently obtained the ballots, then filled them out on behalf of the voters who had never received them. He received a five-year prison sentence. -- Source

Oklahoma -- 2012 

Darryl Cates, of Westville, entered a plea of nolo contendere to charges of false notarization of absentee ballots. The charges stemmed from the 2009 Cave Springs School District election, in which 33 ballots were disputed based on inconsistencies between the signatures on ballot request forms and voter affidavits. All of the contested ballots were notarized by Cates. He was essentially charged with signing the names of two voters on absentee ballots. Following his plea, Cates received a three-year deferred sentence. -- Source

West Virginia -- 2012

Former Lincoln County Commissioner Thomas Ramey pleaded guilty to lying to federal officers in the midst of their investigation of a massive voter fraud conspiracy. Sheriff Jerry Bowman and County Clerk Donald Whitten also pleaded guilty, admitting that they stuffed ballot boxes with fraudulent ballots and falsified absentee ballots in an effort to rig the 2010 Democratic primary. Whitten won the election, but a judge overturned the election after throwing out 300 fraudulent ballots. Ramey was sentenced to 21 months of imprisonment. Bowman was sentenced to one year and one day in federal prison, three years of supervised release, and a $5,000 fine. Whitten was sentenced to 18 months in prison and three years of supervised release, with a $5,000 fine. -- Source

Alabama -- 2012

Shelia Pritchett, of Phenix City, was charged with two counts of second-degree forgery and two counts of absentee ballot fraud stemming from illegal activity while working for a 2012 candidate for municipal office. Pritchett pleaded guilty to all four counts and was sentenced to 22 months of probation, and fined $2,500. A spokeswoman for the Russell County district attorney confirmed the disposition of this case. -- Source

Alabama -- 2012

Stephanie Elias, of Columbus, was charged with four counts of second-degree forgery and four counts of absentee ballot fraud stemming from illegal activity while working for a 2012 candidate for municipal office in Phenix City. Elias pleaded guilty to all eight counts and was sentenced to 22 months of probation, and fined $2,500. A spokeswoman for the Russell County district attorney confirmed the disposition of this case. -- Source

Connecticut – 2011

City Councilwoman Lydia Martinez admitted to illegally assisting in the filling out of absentee ballots, as well as encouraging those not eligible to vote absentee to do so. Martinez targeted residents of an assisted living home, Harborview Towers. She was ordered by the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission to pay a $500 fine. This was not the first time she was fined by the Commission: In 2008, she was found liable to pay $664 to the Citizens Election Fund for the excess expenditures her campaign committee made for her failed run for the State House. -- Source

Georgia -- 2011

Former Twiggs County Sheriff Doyle Stone and his son, Greg Stone, were investigated for mishandling absentee ballots in Greg Stone's 2008 primary campaign for sheriff. Absentee voters complained that Doyle Stone coerced them into voting for Greg Stone, and then took their ballots rather than allow them to be mailed in. Greg Stone lost the election by a wide margin. Both men agreed to pay $300 in civil fines. -- Source

Illinois -- 2011

Michael Collins was convicted of election fraud and tax evasion after giving a false address to establish eligibility to vote in East St. Louis, even though he lived in Swansea. He was also elected to be a precinct committeeman in East St. Louis after getting family members to sign petitions to get him on the ballot. He was sentenced to 50 months in prison followed by three years of supervised release. -- Source

Indiana -- 2011

Monte Murphy, a former Muncie City Councilman, was convicted of three counts of illegally receiving absentee ballots following a jury trial. He provided the ballots to the individuals, told them how to vote for a straight Democrat ticket, and then mailed in the ballots for them. The trial court reduced each conviction to a Class A misdemeanor and sentenced Monte to consecutive one-year terms, suspended to probation. -- Source

Mississippi -- 2011

Terrance Watts, a convicted felon and therefore ineligible to vote, pleaded guilty to two counts of voter fraud for swearing in an affidavit on an absentee ballot that he was eligible to vote in Madison County and for voting in two elections. He was sentenced to two consecutive five-year prison terms. -- Source

Mississippi -- 2011

NAACP official Lessadolla Sowers was convicted on 10 counts of fraudulently casting absentee ballots for voting in the names of 10 people, four of them deceased. She received a five-year sentence for each count, to be served concurrently. -- Source

Montana -- 2011

Alan Lloyd Skari pleaded guilty to a "limits on voting rights" charge after he submitted his ex-wife's absentee ballot without her permission. He was given a six-month suspended sentence and ordered to pay a $250 fine plus a $35 surcharge. -- Source

New Jersey -- 2011

Angel Colon pleaded guilty to a charge of second-degree election fraud for fraudulently submitting absentee messenger ballots on behalf of voters who never received the ballots or had an opportunity to cast their votes. He was sentenced to three years in prison. -- Source

New Jersey -- 2011

Ronald Harris pleaded guilty to charges in connection with an absentee ballot fraud conspiracy, in which he and 13 others shredded ballots which cast votes for the opposition during the 2009 Atlantic City Democratic primary. He was sentenced to 181 days in prison. -- Source



Ohio -- 2011

Deshara M. McKinney, of Columbus, pleaded guilty to falsifying signatures on applications for absentee ballots while working as a canvasser in the 2009 ballot initiative to allow casinos in Ohio. McKinney fled the state after her fraud was discovered, and was eventually arrested in Michigan. She was sentenced to two years of probation and ordered to complete 40 hours of community service. She was also required to pay court costs and the cost of her extradition. -- Source

New Jersey -- 2010

Ernest Storr pleaded guilty to committing absentee ballot fraud by tampering with ballots in the Atlantic City mayoral campaigns of Marty Small and former Mayor Scott Evans. Storr tampered with absentee ballots and instructed a Small campaign worker to do the same. Storr was one of 14 individuals arrested on various voter fraud charges involving Councilman Small's failed 2009 mayoral bid. He was sentenced to probation in May 2013. -- Source

New Jersey -- 2010

Gianine Narvaez, a former data processing technician for the Essex County Commissioner of Registration and Superintendent of Elections, pleaded guilty to third-degree charges of absentee ballot fraud and tampering with public records or information. Narvaez was sentenced to a three-year prison term. --- Source

Illinois -- 2010

William Brown, of Cahokia, pleaded guilty to 22 charges related to election fraud after he worked with candidates for the Cahokia village board to rig their 2009 municipal election. Brown helped to apply for fraudulent absentee ballots and submit votes using those ballots. He was sentenced to 10 days in jail, two years probation, and 200 hours of community service. -- Source

Illinois -- 2010

Anish Eapen, a city streets and sanitation superintendent in Chicago's 50th ward, pleaded guilty to absentee ballot violations. He approached residents of his ward while showing them his town badge, offered to help them cast absentee ballots, and filled out some of their ballots himself while working for an alderman candidate. Eapen was sentenced to 364 days in Cook County jail. -- Source

Illinois -- 2010

Kyle R. Johnson, a former Cahokia village trustee, falsified absentee ballot applications and illegally cast the ballots he obtained during a municipal election. He received five years' probation, 14 days in jail, and 200 hours of community service. -- Source

Illinois -- 2010

Armando Ramos, of Chicago, pleaded guilty to absentee ballot violations in 2010. He had approached residents, offered to help them vote absentee, and in some cases filled out ballots for them during a 2007 election in which he was working for an alderman candidate. He was sentenced to 270 days in Cook County jail. -- Source

Illinois -- 2010

In the 2009 Cahokia municipal election, former village trustee Trevon L. Tompkin falsified absentee ballot applications and illegally voted the ballots he obtained. He received five years' probation, 14 days in jail, and 200 hours of community service. -- Source

Illinois -- 2010

Kevin Wiggins, of Cahokia, pleaded guilty to 43 charges against him in a voter fraud scheme in Cahokia's 2009 municipal election. Wiggins, along with candidates for the village board, filed fraudulent applications for absentee ballots and subsequently voted using those ballots. He was sentenced to 10 days in jail, two years of probation, and 200 hours of community service. -- Source

Georgia -- 2010

Carleton Vines and his accomplices ran an absentee ballot fraud operation designed to rig the 2006 election in which Vines won election as a state court judge. Vines's co-conspirators acted as "runners," illegally "assisting" voters in filling out their absentee ballots. In many cases, ballots were transported by the conspirators to Vines's law office before being subsequently mailed. The group signed a consent decree with the state board of election, acknowledging their actions and accepting a public reprimand. Vines was fined $15,000. -- Source

Georgia -- 2010

Tommy Raney, a 2007 candidate for the Jackson City Council, and his campaign worker, Debra Brown, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit absentee ballot fraud for mishandling more than 40 absentee ballots in the 2007 Jackson City Council race. Raney had won the election by 27 votes. Both were sentenced to two years' probation. Raney was fined $158,000, and Brown was fined $20,000. -- Source

Alabama -- 2010

Ms. Berry pleaded guilty and received a two-year suspended sentence. The former Pike County Commissioner narrowly won--and then lost--her 2008 reelection bid when 10 absentee ballots were found to have been fraudulently cast in the election. Ms. Berry was charged with mailing an illegal absentee ballot. -- Source

Pennsylvania -- 2010

David Patrick Duffy, of Doylestown, pleaded guilty to forgery, record tampering, and making an unsworn falsification to authorities in relation to falsified voter registrations. He forged numerous individuals' signatures on fraudulent voter registrations. Duffy was sentenced to two years of probation and ordered to pay court costs. -- Source

Alabama -- 2010

Gay Nell Tinker, a former circuit clerk for Hale County, pleaded guilty to multiple counts of absentee ballot fraud after her scheme to orchestrate fraudulent absentee ballots for the benefit of multiple candidates was uncovered. She admitted to falsifying the ballots of five voters to benefit certain candidates, including her brother, Circuit Court Judge Marvin Wiggins, and her husband, Senator Bobby Singleton (D_Greensboro). -- Source

Washington -- 2010

Janice Waters, of Marysville, was convicted of illegal registration in the wrong county, absentee ballot fraud, and illegal double voting in the 2008 general election. Waters submitted a ballot for her son, who was a convicted felon and ineligible to vote. Upon questioning, Waters told the County Sheriff's Office she did not submit her son's ballot and suspected her mail had been intercepted or misdirected. Forensic scientists analyzed Waters' signature with the signature on her son's absentee ballot and concluded she had submitted the form. Waters was sentenced to 20 days in jail; the sentence was later converted to 160 hours of community service. -- Source

Wisconsin -- 2010

Irving Anders of Prairie Du Chien pleaded guilty to a charge of absentee ballot fraud. He was ordered to pay a court assessment of $883. -- Source

Wisconsin -- 2010

The Wisconsin couple was convicted of voting twice, with each casting absentee ballots in elections in the town of Wyocena, where they owned a cabin, before later voting in the city of Blooming Grove. The victor in the Wyocena trustee's race--who also happened to be the Kwiatkowskis' preferred candidate--won by a two-vote margin, prompting the judge to declare that the couple's fraud swung the election. Mr. Kwiatkowski was fined $2,000 and his wife received a $1,500 fine. -- Source

Wisconsin -- 2009

Stephen Wroblewski pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of Providing False Information to Obtain an Absentee Ballot. Wroblewski illegally procured a ballot in order to vote in the 2008 election in the name of his wife, a Democrat activist who had recently passed away. He was given a $500 fine. -- Source

Washington -- 2009

Susan Risenhoover pleaded guilty to forging the signature of her son (who had moved to Texas) on an absentee ballot and then submitting it in connection with the 2008 election. She was sentenced to 40 hours of community service. -- Source

Alabama -- 2009

Valada Paige Banks and Rosie Lyles pleaded guilty to third-degree possession of a forged affidavit of an absentee ballot with intent to defraud. They both received 12-month suspended sentences and two years of probation and were ordered to pay court fees. -- Source

Mississippi -- 2009

Jerry Kennamore, a 2009 New Albany mayoral candidate, pleaded guilty to forging the name of his daughter as an attesting witness on an absentee ballot during the May 2009 Democratic primary. Kennamore's plea was held in abeyance pending completion of five years of unsupervised probation and payment of a $1,000 fine plus court costs. -- Source

Connecticut -- 2009

In 2009, Lillian Cummings Stevenson agreed to a consent order after the State Elections Enforcement Commission found her guilty of illegally signing and submitting two absentee ballot request forms on behalf of her sons, who were living in Europe. She was given a $200 fine. -- Source

New Jersey -- 2009

Rocio Rivera and Edwin Cruz were indicted for tampering with ballots and fraudulently submitting ballots in favor of New Jersey Senator Teresa Ruiz. They and a fellow co-conspirator obtained messenger ballots from the county clerk and submitted them to the board of elections as votes on behalf of voters who, in fact, never received or filled out their ballots. John Fernandez was convicted of conspiracy (2nd degree), election fraud (2nd degree), absentee ballot fraud (3rd degree), tampering with public records or information (3rd degree), and forgery (4th degree). Cruz pleaded guilty to third-degree tampering with public records or information, and Rivera pleaded guilty to third-degree absentee ballot fraud. -- Source

New Jersey -- 2009

Samuel Gonzalez was indicted for tampering with ballots and fraudulently submitting ballots in favor of New Jersey Senator Teresa Ruiz. He and his co-conspirators obtained messenger ballots from the county clerk and submitted them to the board of elections as votes on behalf of voters who, in fact, never received or filled out their ballots. Gonzalez agreed to forfeit his seat on the freeholder board and his job as an aide to a Newark city councilman and was admitted into the Pre-Trial Intervention Program. -- Source

New Jersey -- 2009

Former Roselle Borough Council President Jamel Holley was charged with absentee ballot fraud for filling out and submitting more than 20 ballots in the 2006 election. The judge permitted Holley to enter into a pretrial intervention program for one year (if successfully completed, the charges would be dismissed) and to pay a $125 fine. Holley has since been elected mayor of Roselle and appointed to the New Jersey General Assembly. -- Source

New Mexico -- 2009

Teresa Monahan, of Santa Fe, New Mexico, pleaded guilty to voter fraud in a referendum election for casting her own vote and then seeking to vote by an absentee ballot for her deceased brother. She was convicted of a fourth-degree felony and entered into a diversion program that stipulates if she complies with the terms of her probation, the charge will be erased from her record. She was sentenced to between nine and 18 months on probation. -- Source

Ohio -- 2009

Michele Finney, of Columbus, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge related to voter fraud in the 2008 election. Finney had signed her son's absentee ballot and voted herself. She was sentenced to 180 days' imprisonment, which would be suspended if she paid the $1000 fine within three months. -- Source

Ohio -- 2009

Cathy LaMaster pleaded guilty to attempted false election registration. She filled out an absentee ballot for herself in Franklin County, and filled another out for her daughter in Guernsey County, where she goes to school. LaMaster was fined $1,000 and sentenced to one year on probation with a suspended six-month jail sentence. -- Source

Indiana -- 2008

Ponciano Herrera, a Lake County police officer, pleaded guilty to handling a forged absentee ballot in the 2003 East Chicago Democratic mayoral primary election. Herrera was sentenced to 90 days of probation. Fraud in this 2003 mayoral primary was widespread, and the Indiana Supreme Court ultimately overturned the election results and ordered a special election that resulted in a different winner. -- Source

Indiana -- 2008

Ronald DeCastro, an East Chicago police officer, pleaded guilty to a charge of voter fraud in connection with his misconduct during the 2003 East Chicago Democratic mayoral primary election. He did not live in East Chicago, so he used the address of his uncle in order to cast an absentee ballot in the election. DeCastro received a 60-day suspended jail sentence and was sentenced to 60 days of probation. Fraud in this 2003 mayoral primary was widespread, and the Indiana Supreme Court ultimately overturned the election results and ordered a special election that resulted in a different winner. -- Source

Indiana -- 2008

Terrance Lay, a city council candidate in the 2003 East Chicago Democratic primary, pleaded guilty to procuring and handling an absentee ballot for his brother-in-law in violation of state law that forbids anyone other than the voter or a close relative from handling absentee ballots. Lay was the last of the 46 people convicted by the Joint Vote Fraud Task Force formed in the wake of the 2003 East Chicago Democratic primary. Fraud in this 2003 primary was widespread, and the Indiana Supreme Court ultimately overturned the election results and ordered a special election for the mayoral primary that resulted in a different winner. -- Source

Minnesota -- 2008

Kristy Dettle from Fridley, Minnesota was charged with voting more than once in the same election, making or signing a false certificate, and making a false or untrue statement on an absentee ballot application. She pleaded guilty to voting more than once, and the other charges were dismissed. She was sentenced to one year of probation and a fine of $1,000. -- Source

Missouri -- 2008

Joel Neal, of St. Louis, Missouri, voted twice in the 2008 primary election: once in person for himself, and once via absentee ballot in the name of his deceased mother. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to one month of home confinement and was ordered to pay a $2,000 fine. -- Source

South Carolina -- 2008

Mayor Christopher Campbell was convicted of voter fraud, forgery, and official misconduct. Campbell filled out 16 absentee ballots, then found and persuaded voters who had not made it to the polls to cast them in their own names. Campbell was sentenced to 18 months in prison. -- Source

Washington -- 2008

Todd Stuart McGuire, of Port Townsend, was ordered to participate in a diversion program that includes five years of supervision. McGuire cast a ballot in his wife's name in a 2007 special election. He agreed to an order that "facts sufficient for a guilty" finding existed in his case. McGuire was barred from voting during the five-year supervision period. -- Source

Virginia -- 2007

Former Appalachia mayor Ben Cooper and 14 others were convicted of voter fraud after conspiring to manipulate the 2004 elections in his town by buying the votes of residents, offering them cigarettes, beer, and pork rinds. He and his supporters also stole absentee ballots from the mail. This was the largest voter fraud conspiracy to date in Virginia. Cooper was sentenced to 10 years in prison, but the term was suspended after he served two years in jail and another two years in electronic home monitoring detention. Most of the other 14 defendants received suspended sentences or house arrest. -- Source

Michigan -- 2007

Following a jury trial, Reverend Edward Pinkney of Benton Harbor was found guilty of possessing other individuals' absentee ballots and buying votes in a 2005 runoff election. At a local soup kitchen, Pinkney would pay $5 to each poor or homeless person who would fill out an absentee ballot. -- Source

Indiana -- 2007

Allan "Twig" Simmons, an operative for the Chicago mayor's campaign, was charged with three counts of attempted obstruction of justice and six counts of ballot fraud after persuading individuals to let him fill out their absentee ballots in exchange for jobs. He pleaded guilty to three counts of fraudulent application, showing, examination, receipt or delivery of ballots. He was sentenced to 3 years' probation and 100 hours of community service. Fraud in the 2003 East Chicago mayoral primary was widespread, and the Indiana Supreme Court ultimately overturned the election results and ordered a special election for the mayoral race that resulted in a different winner. -- Source

Indiana -- 2007

Tonya Griffin-Bronaugh, the sister of Terrance Lay, pleaded guilty to filling out and signing an application for an absentee ballot in the name of her former husband without his knowledge in connection with the 2003 East Chicago Democratic primary. Her brother was a city council candidate in that election. Griffin-Bronaugh was sentenced to 18 months of probation. Fraud in this 2003 mayoral primary was widespread, and the Indiana Supreme Court ultimately overturned the election results and ordered a special election for the mayoral race that resulted in a different winner. -- Source

Georgia -- 2007

James Bryant, Jr. admitted to improperly assisting voters in completing their absentee ballots in the 2005 Americus mayoral election. Bryant was a candidate in that election, and on at least six occasions, he helped voters fill out the information on their ballot mailers without signing the requisite oath indicating he had provided the assistance. He was ordered by the State Election Board to pay a $600 fine. -- Source

Georgia -- 2007

Jerry Metts was investigated for helping illegal aliens cast absentee ballots in Atkinson County during a 2004 county commission election. He was fined $80,000 by the State Election Board. --Source: bit.ly/2f1yAXk

Mississippi -- 2007

In a civil case filed by the federal government, Ike Brown, former Chairman of the Noxubee County Democratic Executive Committee and Superintendent of Democratic Primary Elections, was found to have violated Section Two of the Voting Rights Act through racially motivated manipulation of ballots. Brown, who started chairing the Commission in 2000, obtained and improperly counted defective absentee ballots, and allowed for improper "assistance" of voters to ensure that white political candidates lost and black candidates won. He was permanently enjoined from engaging in such conduct in the future, and an independent administrator was appointed to ensure compliance. -- Source

Mississippi -- 2007

Martha Gardner pleaded guilty to one count of voter fraud in connection with absentee ballot misconduct during the 2005 Houston mayoral Democratic primary. Witnesses alleged that Gardner had come to them with absentee ballots they did not request and marked the ballots for them. Gardner was initially indicted on 37 counts of voter fraud. A judge imposed a five-year suspended sentence and put Gardner on 30 months of probation. Gardner was also ordered to pay $391.50 in court costs, $100 of which would go to the Crime Victim's Compensation Fund. -- Source

Wisconsin -- 2007

Kimberly Prude, a campaign volunteer for the Kerry_Edwards campaign, was convicted of illegally casting an absentee ballot in the 2004 election. She was already a convicted felon for forgery charges in 2000. Her probation was revoked and she is now serving her sentence in prison. -- Source

Colorado -- 2006

Winston Keyes, of Denver, Colorado, pleaded guilty to voting twice in the 2005 general election. He forged his mother's signature on her absentee ballot, despite the fact that his mother had died in July of that year. He was sentenced to one year of probation and was ordered to pay court costs. -- Source

Indiana -- 2006

Eduardo Perez, Sr., pleaded guilty to fraudulently receiving an absentee ballot in connection to the 2003 East Chicago mayoral Democrat primary. He was sentenced to 18 months of probation. Fraud in this 2003 mayoral primary was widespread, and the Indiana Supreme Court ultimately overturned the election results and ordered a special election that resulted in a different winner. -- Source

Washington -- 2006

Balogh was found guilty of making false or misleading statements to a public servant, as well as absentee ballot fraud and registration fraud. In 2006, Balogh registered her dog, Duncan, to vote under her address and telephone number and successfully completed and mailed an absentee ballot for him. Balogh claimed she was drawing attention to flaws in the absentee ballot system. She received a one-year deferred sentence, and was ordered to perform 10 hours of community service and pay court fees of $240. -- Source

Washington -- 2005 

Doris McFarland's husband passed away before he could vote in the 2004 election, and Mrs. McFarland decided to cast his absentee ballot. She later admitted to double voting in that year's election but avoided jail time. She was ordered to pay court fees and a $490 fine. -- Source

Washington -- 2005

Robert Victor Holmgren cast a ballot for his recently-deceased wife in the 2004 general election. He pleaded guilty to voting twice in an election and was ordered to pay $490 in fines and court fees. -- Source

Connecticut – 2005

Prenzina Holloway, of Hartford, Connecticut, voted using another voter's absentee ballot in the 2004 Democratic primary. She was ordered to pay a civil penalty to the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission in the amount of $10,000, but she was only required to pay $2,000 because of financial hardship. Ironically, she was later hired by the Hartford Democratic registrar of voters to work in connection with a 2009 municipal election. -- Source

Alabama -- 2005

The Birmingham Office of the U.S. Attorney and the Alabama Attorney General conducted an extensive joint investigation of absentee ballot fraud allegations in Greene County in the November 1994 election. By the end of the investigation, nine defendants pleaded guilty to voter fraud, and two others were found guilty by a jury. The defendants included Greene County commissioners, officials, and employees; a racing commissioner; a member of the board of education; a Eutaw city councilman; and other community leaders. The conspiracy included using an assembly line to mass-produce forged absentee ballots meant to swing elections in favor of preferred candidates. -- Source

Illinois -- 2004

A former election judge, Leander Brooks, pleaded guilty to election fraud in the 2002 election. He forged signatures of three dead people on absentee ballot applications. He was sentenced to 18 months in prison and a $400 fine. -- Source

Illinois -- 2004

Patricia Deganutti was found guilty of violating Illinois absentee ballot law by "unlawful observation of voting." While serving as a precinct captain in Cicero, Illinois, she visited a voter's home and persuaded him to apply for an absentee ballot, then returned and told him how to fill it out, and left with the completed ballot. She was sentenced to 18 months' probation. -- Source

Connecticut -- 2003

Eva Corrigan admitted to failing to co-sign the absentee ballots of those she assisted. She was ordered by the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission to pay a $100 civil penalty. -- Source

Connecticut -- 2003

Former state representative Barnaby Horton was charged with absentee ballot fraud after he was caught inducing elderly residents to cast absentee ballots for him. After a lengthy court battle, he pleaded guilty to felony charges of ballot fraud and agreed to pay a $10,000 fine, one of the largest fines ever imposed by the State Elections Enforcement Commission. A Superior Court judge sentenced Horton to two years' probation and ordered to perform 1,000 hours of community service. -- Source

Indiana -- 2003

Michelle Chandler, a worker in the city controller's office, was charged with a fraudulent receipt of ballot, voting outside of her district, and perjury in connection to misconduct during the 2003 East Chicago Democratic mayoral primary. She was found guilty of one count of perjury in a jury trial, a felony, and given one year of probation. Fraud in this 2003 mayoral primary was widespread, and the Indiana Supreme Court ultimately overturned the election results and ordered a special election that resulted in a different winner. -- Source

Alabama -- 2002

Nathaniel Gosha was convicted of 25 counts (nine felony counts of falsifying ballots and 16 counts of second-degree possession of a forged instrument) of voter fraud for offering to sell absentee votes in Russell County. Another Russell County resident, Lizzie Mae Perry, pleaded guilty to two felony counts of falsifying absentee ballots and two misdemeanor counts of disclosing votes. Gosha was sentenced to 180 days in jail, 4.5 years of probation, and $2,600 in court fines. Perry was sentenced to 30 days in jail and 18 months' probation. -- Source

Arkansas -- 2002

Larry Gray was charged with illegally casting more than 25 absentee ballots in other people's names during the 2002 primary, but the sum total of his election fraud may have been much higher. The former sanitation director for the city applied for hundreds of ballots, successfully submitting 98 in the Democratic primary. According to the U.S. Attorney's Office, Gray was likely not the only one running this type of scheme. After pleading guilty, Gray received two years' probation. -- Source

Connecticut -- 2002

Hector Riellano admitted to failing to acknowledge assisting someone with the filing of their absentee ballot. He was fined $350 by the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission. -- Source

Connecticut -- 2001

Sybil Allen, while serving as a Democrat on the Bridgeport Town Committee, engaged in a range of absentee ballot-related fraud. Allen completed ballot applications in the name of residents, forged signatures, and on at least one occasion got a voter to forge a ballot registration form for a family member who no longer lived in the community. Allen also told one voter that a candidate was not on the ballot and watched voters fill out their ballots before taking possession of them. Allen eventually agreed to pay a civil fine of $5,000 and was barred from running for re-election for two years. -- Source

Connecticut -- 2001

Warren Blunt, a city councilman in Bridgeport, pleaded guilty to being present while people cast their absentee ballots and subsequently taking those ballots while running for re-election in the town's Democratic primary. The State of Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission fined Blunt $2,500 and required him to resign from the town committee. He was also barred from running for elected office again for two years. -- Source

Connecticut -- 2001

As part of a "get out the vote" campaign leading up to the 2000 election, Ronald Caveness admitted to distributing absentee ballots, being present while people filled them out, and then collecting them. After an investigation by the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission, he agreed to resign from the Democratic Town Committee, not seeking re-election for two years, and pay a fine of $4,000, which was eventually reduced to $1,000. -- Source

Connecticut -- 2001

Paulette Park, while working for a candidate for Bridgeport's 2000 Democratic Town Committee primary election, illegally persuaded voters to list false reasons for requesting absentee ballots, assisted them in applying for absentee ballots, and took possession of the absentee ballots after watching voters fill them out. The State of Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission fined her $5,000 and banned her from working on future campaigns. -- Source

Wyoming -- 2001

After moving from their Evansville home, Gary and Leila Blake requested absentee ballots. The ballots were returned with Evansville offices and ballot issues, which the couple filled out and returned despite no longer living there. The couple pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor charge. Each must pay $350 in fines and serve six months on probation. -- Source

Connecticut -- 2000

George Cabrera, Jr., entered into a settlement with the State of Connecticut Election Enforcement Commission. Cabrera admitted to observing a resident fill out an absentee ballot before taking possession of that ballot during the Democratic primary for town council. Cabrera agreed to pay a $750 fine. -- Source

Florida -- 2000

Hialeah Gardens Mayor Gilda Oliveros was convicted of six charges that ranged from voter fraud to asking two of her former employees to murder her then-husband so she could cash in on a $45,000 life insurance policy. She was sentenced to 4.8 years in state prison but was released on a $100,000 bond to appeal her sentence. -- Source

Alabama -- 2000

Melvin Lightning pleaded guilty to illegal absentee voting. Along with Evans, Lightning forged absentee ballot request forms in the name of other voters. Upon receiving the ballots, the pair took them to the named voters and obtained their signatures on the ballot envelope without telling the voters that they were signing an actual ballot. Lightning then completed and cast the ballots himself. He received a 12-month prison sentence, which was suspended in favor of 12 months' probation. His accomplice, Evans, was convicted in 1998 on seven counts of illegal absentee voting. He got a 10-year prison sentence, eight of which were suspended. -- Source

Ohio -- 2000 

Jon Saylor ordered absentee ballots sent to the home of a friend and then filled them out as votes for himself. After winning the seat of the 1st Ward councilman in Fairfield, Ohio, the election results were called into question and an investigation was opened. Saylor was convicted of 29 counts of false registrations, one count of inducing illegal voting, 12 counts of absentee voter's ballot violation, 14 counts of illegal voting, one count of election falsification, and one count of interference with the conduct of an election. He was sentenced to 24 months' imprisonment. -- Source

Alabama -- 2000

An absentee-ballot buying operation was uncovered in Winston County, Alabama, that led to the conviction of the sheriff, circuit clerk, a district judge, and several candidates for county commission and the board of education. The conspirators set out to buy absentee ballots in the 2000 Republican primary with bribes of cash, beer, and liquor. Judge Richardson pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of failing to report campaign expenditures; the others pleaded guilty to felony charges stemming from the operation. Bailey was sentenced to three years' probation, plus a $1,000 fine and 250 hours of community service. Neal got three years' probation, a $2,500 fine, and 250 hours' community service. Ingram was ordered to serve a year in prison and pay a $1,000 fine. Emerson got two years' probation. Judge Richardson resigned, and received a suspended six-month prison sentence, one-year probation, and a $1,000 fine. -- Source

Oregon -- 2000

Terri Kobialka was a University of Oregon student during the 2000 election when she filled out a ballot mailed to her apartment in the name of a former tenant. Kobialka pleaded guilty to falsely signing a ballot, a Class C felony. She was sentenced to 18 months of probation, ordered to complete 120 hours of community service, and fined $500. -- Source

Pennsylvania -- 1999

Former Congressman Austin Murphy was convicted on one charge of absentee ballot fraud. Murphy forged ballots for senior citizens living in a nursing home, claiming merely to be assisting them in exercising their voting rights. He was sentenced to six months of probation and ordered to perform 50 hours of community service. -- Source

Florida -- 1998

Humberto Hernandez was convicted of being an accessory to covering up fraud and removed from office after it was discovered that hundreds of fraudulent absentee ballots were cast in his favor. He was sentenced to a one-year prison term. -- Source

Georgia -- 1998

The Georgia State Election Board sanctioned Jackie Bailey, along with four others, in regard to her illegal possession of 107 absentee ballots in the June 1998 Democratic Primary Election for Coffee County Commissioner. She was fined $1,000. Secretary of State Cathy Cox indicated that the fines for possession of absentee ballots were equal to the most severe penalties ever ordered by the board for violations of the election code. The Board referred the case to the Waycross Judicial Circuit District Attorney Richard E. Currie as a potential criminal case. -- Source

Georgia – 1998

The Georgia State Election Board sanctioned Gloria Davis, along with four others, in regard to her illegal possession of 107 absentee ballots in the June 1998 Democratic Primary Election for Coffee County Commissioner. She was fined $1,000. Secretary of State Cathy Cox indicated that the fines for possession of absentee ballots were equal to the most severe penalties ever ordered by the board for violations of the election code. The Board referred the case to the Waycross Judicial Circuit District Attorney Richard E. Currie as a potential criminal case. -- Source

Georgia -- 1998

The Georgia State Election Board sanctioned Doris Gaskins, along with four others, in regard to her illegal possession of 107 absentee ballots in the June 1998 Democratic Primary Election for Coffee County Commissioner. She was fined $1,000. Secretary of State Cathy Cox indicated that the fines for possession of absentee ballots were equal to the most severe penalties ever ordered by the board for violations of the election code. The Board referred the case to the Waycross Judicial Circuit District Attorney Richard E. Currie as a potential criminal case. -- Source

Georgia -- 1998

The Georgia State Election Board sanctioned Rudene McNeair, along with four others, in regard to her illegal possession of 107 absentee ballots in the June 1998 Democratic Primary Election for Coffee County Commissioner. She was fined $1,000. Secretary of State Cathy Cox indicated that the fines for possession of absentee ballots were equal to the most severe penalties ever ordered by the board for violations of the election code. The Board referred the case to the Waycross Judicial Circuit District Attorney Richard E. Currie as a potential criminal case. -- Source

Georgia -- 1998

The Georgia State Election Board sanctioned Betty Stewart, along with four others, in regard to her illegal possession of 107 absentee ballots in the June 1998 Democratic Primary Election for Coffee County Commissioner. She was fined $1,000. Secretary of State Cathy Cox indicated that the fines for possession of absentee ballots were equal to the most severe penalties ever ordered by the board for violations of the election code. The Board referred the case to the Waycross Judicial Circuit District Attorney Richard E. Currie as a potential criminal case. -- Source

New Mexico -- 1998

Gillian Yingling and 18 others, of Rio Arriba County, including several local officials, were arrested on election-fraud charges, including ineligible absentee voting and false statements on absentee ballots. Yingling pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor voter fraud charge, receiving 364 days' supervised probation. -- Source

Connecticut -- 1997

Liz Diaz, a former 4th District town committee member in Hartford, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit election fraud and to witness tampering after she registered ineligible voters to receive absentee ballots and intimidated a witness to lie about her reason for requesting an absentee ballot in a court hearing regarding the 1996 Democratic town committee election. She was sentenced to two months in jail. -- Source

Connecticut -- 1997

Virgen Figueroa, a former town committee member from Hartford, pleaded guilty to absentee ballot fraud and forgery. In a plot with several other individuals to elect Democrat candidates for town committee in the 1996 election, Figueroa registered ineligible voters to receive absentee ballots and helped them to mark their ballots. She was sentenced to two months in jail. -- Source

Connecticut -- 1996

Edwin E. Garcia, a former lawmaker, and Hartford Police Sergeant, pleaded no contest to three felony counts of absentee ballot fraud, tampering with a witness, and accepting an illegal campaign contribution. Garcia and his campaign workers systematically registered hundreds of young voters and furnished many with absentee ballots that they neither qualified for nor understood. He received a sentence of one year of house arrest.-- Source

Connecticut – 1994

Jacqueline Rogers was a campaign worker for James Holloway, a candidate for City Council. In the 1993 primary, she was paid $150 to dress up in a nurse's uniform with a certified nurse nametag and solicit "emergency" absentee ballots from patients. She instructed at least one voter to cast her ballot for Holloway. The primary was ultimately decided in Holloway's favor by just nine votes. The Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission barred her from participating in political campaigns for five years. -- Source

Mississippi -- 1993

Calvin McFarland, an incumbent running for re-election to the Wilkinson County Board of Supervisors, was convicted on two counts relating to illegally signing absentee ballots. McFarland, a Democrat, lost in the primary, and after a lengthy series of runoffs and challenges, was indicted along with 13 other then-current and former county officials. McFarland was charged with six counts of falsely signing names to ballots, and was convicted of two. One of them charged McFarland with signing a ballot in the name of 'Lottie James,' and then falsely attesting that James' signature was valid. For each charge, McFarland was sentenced to five years' imprisonment and ordered to pay a $1,000 fine. One of the prison sentences was suspended. -- Source

Mississippi – 1993

Sandra Sewell was convicted on voter fraud charges stemming from her 1991 efforts to help Calvin McFarland fraudulently win re-election for a seat on the Wilkinson County Board of Supervisors. Sewell notarized fraudulent absentee ballots in the race. Sewell was convicted on eight counts related to the fraud and ordered to serve five years in prison and pay a $2,000 fine. Sewell, an attorney, was also disbarred. -- Source

Connecticut -- 1991

Curtis Mouning, a campaign volunteer for State Representative Mario Testa during the 1990 election, admitted to signing the names of five of his friends and family members to request absentee ballots to vote in the primary. He was ordered to pay a civil penalty to the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission in the amount of $500. -- Source

Connecticut -- 1988

Ernest Newton, a former state senator, agreed to pay a civil penalty of $1,000 for assisting in filling out someone else's absentee ballot. Newton illegally filled out and mailed an absentee ballot for Ada Crosby. The fraud occurred in the 1988 primary while Newton was a state senate candidate in the 124th District. Following his election, he was imprisoned after accepting a bribe, using campaign contributions for personal expenses, and failing to report improper income on his federal tax return. In 2015, Newton was sentenced to six months' imprisonment for campaign finance violations stemming from having three campaign workers fraudulently sign donation cards in order for the campaign to reach the threshold to qualify for state matching funds. -- Source



We Must Root Out the Wrong-Doers When It Comes to The Absentee Ballot Harvesting Game in Harris County, Texas

AUBREY R. TAYLOR REPORTS©

If one more person calls me trying to dispute the 2-year investigation spearheaded by Colleen M. Vera, I am going to scream. Please. Please. Please. STOP!!! Look, guys, all you have to do is read and look at the compelling data that has been pulled together by Colleen M. Vera on the “Texas Trash Talk” website. The information has been verified and authenticated by me and others. Look, guys, this isn’t about “REPUBLICANS” or “DEMOCRATS” my friends. This is about our Democracy and making sure that people are winning the election fairly and honestly. This is also about the rule of law and the integrity of the people who we allow to sit in positions of authority. After all, every born-again Believer should be very concerned about making sure that our “ELECTED OFFICIALS” have a heart for our LORD AND SAVIOR! Nope, we aren’t trying to elect saints, priests, or theologians to office. But we should be about electing righteous people who will put GOD first, and are willing to put politics aside when it comes to doing what’s right for America. We are a nation of laws folks. And we need Godly people elevated to positions of authority during this dark and desolate times we’re facing – NOT REPUBLICAN OR DEMOCRATS! Yes, I said that – and I meant it too! The time has come for us to reconsider how we vote as Believers! No, do not go back and say that I’m out here preaching to folks – because that’s not my intent here. I am not a preacher, saint, theologian, or perfect person. I’ve made many mistakes in my life. I’ve suffered many setbacks along the way. However, I’ve achieved some great feats in my short time here on the earth. God has blessed me despite my imperfections and shortcomings. So, to all of those folks who believe that they are going to shut me up through fear tactics and threats – YOU DON’T KNOW ME! Once I enter a fight – I’M IN IT TO WIN IT! And there’s been unequivocal – which simply means in a way that is clear and unambiguous – meaning no doubt; some serious cheating going on in Harris County, Texas. And the cheaters must be brought to justice and rooted out. Why? Well, as the good book says, “When the righteous thrive, the people rejoice; when the wicked rule, the people groan.” So, I implore every born-again Believer in “GOD ALMIGHTY” to do your due diligence and check out the “TALK TRASH TEXAS” website. Again, I have independently verified the 2-year investigation that was spearheaded by Colleen M. Vera. She has done a thorough and complete job pulling together her report concerning every single detail she’s included in this extensive report. My friends, this report is not superficial, fictitious or fake as some folks would have you believe.

AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS
957 NASA PARKWAY #251
HOUSTON, TEXAS 77058-3039
PHONE: (832)212-8735
CELL: (281)788-3033




PART 1: GLORIA PALMER DISCUSSES HOW SHE WORKS HARD GOING OUT AND GETTING THOSE ABSENTEE BALLOTS

- TEXAS TRASH TALK -

According to Colleen M. Vera, after the 2016 Democratic Primary, a candidate for Harris County Constable (Pct 3), Jasen Rabalais, filed a lawsuit claiming that a campaign worker for another candidate, Michel Pappillion, “deliberately falsified, illegally completed or unlawfully influenced the ballots and early voting applications of elderly residents in Harris County.” The lawsuit was dismissed. But the audiotape above had been made by the Rabalais campaign after he found out that an “alleged harvester” was working for an opponent’s campaign.





PART 2: GLORIA PALMER SHARES EXACTLY HOW THE ABSENTEE BALLOT GAME WORKS IN HARRIS COUNTY

AUBREY R. TAYLOR REPORTS©

In case you don't know, providing unlawful assistance to a voter in connection with “ABSENTEE BALLOT” is a state jail felony from what I understand. However, having “ABSENTEE VOTERS” select one name on their “ABSENTEE BALLOT" and sign their signature, and then taking the ballot with you is something else altogether. In case you don't know, it also illegal to receive compensation for depositing the carrier-envelope in the mail or with a common or contract carrier folks. Gloria Palmer is presumed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law. For the record, the audiotape above had been made by the Rabalais campaign after he found out that an “alleged harvester” was working for an opponent’s campaign.

AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS
957 NASA PARKWAY #251
HOUSTON, TEXAS 77058-3039
PHONE: (832)212-8735
CELL: (281)788-3033




HOUSTON BUSINESS CONNECTIONS NEWSPAPER© IS BECOMING THE MOST DIVERSE NON-PARTISAN PUBLICATION IN AMERICA

Aubrey R. Taylor is the President/CEO of Aubrey R. Taylor Communications, the publisher of Houston Business Connections Newspaper©. Taylor has more than 29-years of experience in marketing, branding, investigative reporting, public relations, opposition research, and political consulting. He’s assisted in branding Republican and Democratic candidates in statewide elections and in local municipalities throughout the State of Texas. Over the years, he’s also assisted in branding and marketing (through his various publications) such corporations and institutions as Shell Oil, The City of Houston, Texas A&M, Texas Southern University, Prairie View A&M University, Chevron, Shell Oil, Waste Management, Nationwide Insurance, Momentum Jaguar/BMW, Channel 11, Channel 13, State Farm Insurance, and Allstate Insurance to name a few.


THE BEST IN THE BUSINESS

"I have absolutely no idea what's going to happen on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, when Democrats and Republican face-off in Harris County, Texas. However, it behooves all of us to make sure that the "2020 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION" is free from cheating, fraud, and corruption. So, if you are looking to cheat, don't call us. If you're looking for someone to harvest some mail-ballots for you, do not call us. However, if you're looking to implement superior branding and marketing techniques as a way of getting an advantage let Aubrey R. Taylor Communications assist you with accomplishing your goal of winning the office that you're seeking. Our ground game is second to none, that's why we had one of the largest circulated "ELECTION EDITIONS" in the state of Texas back on Tuesday, March 6, 2018, for the Gubernatorial Election. In case you don't remember, we had (26) twenty-six Republican supporters, and (33) thirty-three Democratic supporters. Click here to review this edition. And remember, our readers are "OPEN-MINDED" and are compelled to cast their ballot for the "BEST-QUALIFIED CANDIDATES" who value, respect, and ask for their vote.

AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS
957 NASA PARKWAY #251
HOUSTON, TEXAS 77058-3039
PHONE: (832)212-8735
CELL: (281)788-3033