KEY RUNOFF ELECTION BATTLEGROUND VOTING PRECINCTS FOR MAYOR TOM REID AND HIS CHALLENGER QUENTIN WILTZ IN THE SATURDAY, JUNE 10, 2017 RACE FOR MAYOR OF PEARLAND, TEXAS


THE "PROHIBITIVE FAVORITE" in the race for Mayor of Pearland, Texas is Mayor Tom Reid. Based on our research and study of this race Mayor Tom Reid should win. However, he must reach out to "ALL" Pearlanders to do so. Mayor Tom Reid beat his challenger Quentin Wiltz in the following voter precincts back in the Saturday, May 6, 2017 General Election race for Mayor of Pearland, Texas: 12, 13, 26, 27, 28, 36, 46, 47, 51, 52, 61, 537, and 654. Aubrey R. Taylor Communications is calling these voter precincts Mayor Tom Reid's stronghold-base. These precincts/neighborhoods must go to the polls in record numbers if Mayor Tom Reid is to emerge the victor on Saturday, June 10, 2017. The voting precincts won by Quentin Wiltz back in the Saturday, May 6, 2017 General Election race for Mayor of Pearland, Texas were: 29, 44, 50, 54, 59, 60, 62, 67, 762, and 1134. Aubrey R. Taylor Communications is calling these voter precincts the stronghold-base for Quentin Wiltz. These precincts/neighborhoods must go to the polls in record numbers for Quentin Wiltz to have a chance at unseating Mayor Tom Reid on Saturday, June 10, 2017. Early voting begins on Tuesday, May 30, 2017 and ends on Tuesday, June 6, 2017. Don't forget to vote early!



KEY RUNOFF ELECTION BATTLEGROUND PRECINCTS FOR THE PEARLAND CITY COUNCIL POSITION #7 RACE BETWEEN DALIA KASSEB AND WOODY OWENS ON SATURDAY, JUNE 10, 2017


The "PROHIBITIVE FAVORITE" in the race for Pearland City Council At-Large Position #7 is Woody Owens. However, anything can happen in this race if Woody Owens fails to reach out to voters beyond his current base. At first glance, the election returns look as if Dalia Kasseb should be the clear favorite -- but not so fast! A deeper review of the "PRECINCT CANVASS REPORT" for this race paints a very different picture of what actually happened back on Saturday, May 6, 2017 in the General Election race for Pearland City Council At-Large Position #7. Don't forget that: VOTER PRECINCT 12 and VOTER PRECINCT 26 were won by G.C. Sonny Atkins.VOTER PRECINCT 27 was won by Sherry Stockwell. Keep in mind, VOTER PRECINCT'S 13, 28, 29, 36, 44, 50, 54, 59, 60, 62, 67, 762, and 1134 were won by Dalia Kasseb. Also keep in mind, VOTER PRECINCT'S 46, 47, 51, 52, 61, 537 and 654 were won by Woody Owens back in the Saturday, May 6, 2017 General Election race for Pearland City Council At-Large Position #7. And don't forget that Sherry Stockwell, G.C. Sonny Atkins, and Terry Gray -- three (3) of the candidates who also ran for the newly created Pearland City Council Position #7 seat are endorsing Woody Owens in the Saturday, June 10, 2017 Runoff Election over Dalia Kasseb. Early voting begins on Tuesday, May 30, 2017 and ends on Tuesday, June 6, 2017. 



KEY RUNOFF ELECTION BATTLEGROUND PRECINCTS FOR THE SUGAR LAND CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT #4 RACE BETWEEN CAROL McCUTCHEON AND QAISAR Q. IMAM ON SATURDAY, JUNE 10, 2017


The "PROHIBITIVE FAVORITE" in the race for Sugar Land City Council District #4 is Carol McCutcheon. In case you don't know: Carol McCutcheon beat Qaisar Q. Imam in the following voter precincts to make the Saturday, June 10, 2017 Runoff Election: PRECINCT 4047 (172 to 16), PRECINCT 4064 (21 to 10), PRECINCT 4084 (42 to 23), PRECINCT 4119 (136 to 110), PRECINCT 4131 (41 to 27), and PRECINCT 4135 (85 to 64) according to the Fort Bend County Clerk’s Office. Qaisar Q. Imam beat Carol McCutcheon in the following precincts to make the Saturday, June 10, 2017 Runoff Election: PRECINCT 4102 (236 to 82), and PRECINCT 4129 (167 to 123) according to the Fort Bend County Clerk’s Office. Early voting begins on Tuesday, May 30, 2017 and ends on Tuesday, June 6, 2017. Don't forget to vote early!



 

Friday, March 29, 2013

OPEN THOUGHT: The 2013 Mayoral Election in Houston is set for Tuesday, November 5th, Houston Mayor Annise Parker Shares her Thoughts on the Importance of Voting In Local Elections

“Aubrey R. Taylor Communications, the publisher of Your Thought Matters Newspaper would like to thank Annise Parker the Mayor of Houston for finding value in, and respecting our request to help us inspire, encourage, motivate, and inform people about the importance of participating in local elections by sharing her thoughts on the importance of voting. Mayor Parker is the 61st Mayor in Houston's long and illustrious history of fine leaders. And she is one of only two women to ever become Mayor of Houston. As Houston’s chief executive officer, Mayor Annise Parker is responsible for all aspects of the general management of the City of Houston and the enforcement of all laws and ordinances. On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 in the 2013 Mayoral Election, Mayor Annise Parker will be seeking voter approval to serve her third and final term as Houston’s chief executive officer.”Aubrey R. Taylor, Publisher 


Mayor Annise Parker has spent many years in service to the people of Houston, with six years as a City Council member and six years as City Controller. She is the first person in Houston's history to hold the offices of council member, controller and mayor. This is her second term as mayor; and she is seeking re-election to a third in the 2013 Mayoral Election to be held on Tuesday, November 5, 2013 in the City of Houston. Don't forget to vote!


Mayor Annise Parker and her life partner Kathy Hubbard have been together for more than 20 years and are advocates for adoption, with two adopted daughters and a son.
Mayor Annise Parker, Currently Only the Second Woman to serve as Houston's Chief Executive takes a Moment to Share Her Thoughts on The Importance of Voting 

"I remember voting as a kid with my parents. That was back in the days when you walked into a voting booth, pulled a red curtain behind you, picked your candidates and pulled a lever to cast your ballot. My parents took me every November, and I’ve gone every year as an adult. It’s important to vote for many reasons, but I’ll focus on three.

1) It’s the only opportunity we have, as citizens, to hold our elected officials accountable to the promises they make to us when they’re running for office. I’ve been elected eight times now, so I know that when I make a promise on the campaign trail, voters are listening, and voters will remind me of my promises when I come back in two years.

2) Someone said to me recently – if you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu. Elected officials make very important decisions about how your money is spent and what limits are placed on your life. It’s important that your elected officials know that you care about your rights and your money – and the best way to show them that you care is to vote.

3) And finally, 150 years ago, voting was reserved for a privileged few. African Americans and women risked their lives fighting for the right to vote. They won in 1870 and 1920, respectively. That isn’t very long ago, and every election I am proud to honor those brave civil rights activists by heading to the polls and casting a ballot."


Annise Parker
The 61st Mayor of Houston, Texas


Houston Mayor Annise Parker and her Executive Team: Pictured from left to right: Jessica Michan, Press Secretary; Janice Evans, Director of Communications/Policy; Andy Icken, Chief Development Officer; William Paul Thomas, Council Liaison; Kippy Caraway, Deputy Chief of Staff for Intergovernmental Affairs; Mayor Annise Parker; James Koski, Deputy Chief of Staff; Waynette Chan, Chief of Staff; Jenn Char, Director of Boards and Commissions; Madeleine Appel, Deputy Chief of Staff for Administration; Dave Feldman, City Attorney; Keith Wade, Senior Assistant to the Mayor; Brenda Murphy, Mayor’s Executive Assistant; Kelly Dowe; Director of Finance; Marta Crinejo, Agenda Director.

Here's A Little About Mayor Annise Parker

Mayor Parker is Houston’s 61st mayor and one of only two women to hold the City’s highest elected office. As the City's chief executive officer, she is responsible for all aspects of the general management of the City and for enforcement of all laws and ordinances.

Parker has spent many years in service to the people of Houston, with six years as a City Council member and six years as City Controller. She is the only person in Houston history to hold the offices of council member, controller and mayor. This is her second term as mayor.

Parker’s accomplishments as mayor include job growth far exceeding the number of jobs lost during the recession, resulting in Houston being named the job growth capital of the nation. In addition, she bucked the trend of most other major U.S. cities by balancing three city budgets during the tough economic times without raising taxes or having to eliminate police or firefighter jobs.

The mayor’s tenure also includes passage and implementation of Rebuild Houston, a pay-as-you-go comprehensive street and drainage improvement program that will provide jobs for Houstonians for years to come; voter approval of a $410 public improvement bond program; creation of an independent organization to oversee the City’s crime lab operations; a unique sobering center for public intoxication cases; adoption of a long-term financial plan that ensures the stability of the City’s water department and reorganization of City departments to achieve cost savings and more efficient operations. She created a new City department focused on the needs of neighborhoods and the Office of Business Opportunity to help minority and women-owned small business enterprises compete for City contracts. Additionally, she won City Council approval of a Historic Preservation Ordinance that, for the first time, provides real protection for historic properties in City-designated historic districts and she issued one of the most comprehensive non-discrimination orders in the nation.

Fast Company magazine selected Houston as City of the Year for 2011 and in 2010, Time magazine named Mayor Parker one the 100 most influential people in the world. She has also been the recipient of numerous awards during her career, including the 2011 Guardian of the Bay Award from the Galveston Bay Foundation, Scenic Houston’s 2010 Scenic Visionary Award and the 2010 Guardian of the Human Spirit Award from the Holocaust Museum Houston.

In addition to her duties as mayor, Parker is an active member of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, serves as a member of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary’s Advisory Council and on the boards of the Texas Environmental Research Consortium and Houston Galveston Area Council. She is an advisory board member of the Holocaust Museum, Center for Houston’s Future and Montrose Center.

Mayor Parker is a second generation native Houstonian. She graduated from Rice University with a Bachelor of Arts Degree. In the private sector, Parker spent 20 years working in the oil and gas industry, including 18 years with Mosbacher Energy Company. She also co-owned a retail bookstore for 10 years.

Parker and her life partner Kathy Hubbard have been together for more than 20 years and are advocates for adoption, with two adopted daughters and a son.


Houston's Homelesss Outreach Team: Houston Mayor Annise Parker is pictured here with Houston Police Chief Charles McClelland accepting the keys to HPD’s Mercedes Bend van for its Homeless Outreach Team. The van for HPD’s Homeless Outreach Team sports a black-and-white design and came equipped with a wheelchair lift. The van was donated to HPD by the Frees Foundation and the Simmons Foundation.
The Spring Skate Park, Recreation area is slated to open in Mid-2014: Thanks to Mayor Parker and other Houston area leaders, Houston is going to soon have a world-class skate park and “park without limits” for special-needs children in Spring. The $5.5 million skate park will feature about 72,000 square feet of skate surface, along with competition-scale amenities and large viewing areas. The “park without limits,” known as Dylan’s Park, will have areas focused on engaging children with special needs, such as autistic children, sight-impaired, hearing-impaired, or wheelchair-bound children. Greenspoint Redevelopment Authority is looking to have the park open in mid-2014.

Houston A Bloomberg Philanthropies Winner: Houston has been selected as one of five winners of Bloomberg Philanthropies Mayors Challenge, a competition to inspire American cities to generate innovative and replicable ideas that solve major challenges and improve city.


Houston Selected As One Of Five Winners And The Fan Favorite In Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Mayors Challenge
 
-- $1 Million Prize Awarded For The City’s Revolutionary One Bin For All Idea 

Mayor Annise Parker today announced that Houston’s One Bin for All idea is one of the five winners in the Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Mayors Challenge, a competition to inspire American cities to generate innovative ideas that solve major challenges and improve city life – and that ultimately can be shared with other cities to improve the well-being of the nation. Houston was selected as a Mayors Challenge winner out of a pool of over 300 applicant cities, based on four criteria: vision, ability to implement, potential for impact, and potential for replication. Houston will receive a $1 million innovation prize to help implement its One Bin for All idea. As the winner of the Mayors Challenge Fan Favorite Selection, Houston will receive a $50K in-kind grant from IBM to support the implementation of its One Bin for All idea as well as featured coverage and promotion from The Huffington Post, including a monthly front page column for a year and an interview with Arianna Huffington on Huff Post Live. The City will also receive a sculpture created by world-renowned designer Olafur Eliasson to commemorate each of the Mayors Challenge winners.

“I am thrilled that Houston has been selected as a Mayors Challenge winner," said Mayor Parker. “One Bin for All is a first-of-its kind innovation that will revolutionize the way we handle trash, achieving high-volume recycling and waste diversion, reduced greenhouse gas emissions and lower operating costs. I am anxious to begin implementation because I know this cutting-edge technology has the potential to improve health and quality of life not only in Houston, but around the world.”

“Recycling has often been treated as an individual responsibility, like paying taxes. But Mayor Parker’s innovative One Bin for All idea turns that notion on its head," said Michael R. Bloomberg, philanthropist and Mayor of New York City. “Achieving a 75% recycling recovery rate in Houston would represent a huge leap forward in urban sustainability practices.”

One Bin for All utilizes game-changing technology to separate trash from recyclables, allowing residents to discard all materials in one bin. The anticipated end result is a dramatic increase in the amount of waste diverted from our landfills. Implementation will be achieved through a public/private partnership.

The Mayors Challenge is a competition to inspire American cities to generate innovative ideas that solve major challenges and improve city life. Mayors of U.S. cities with 30,000 residents or more were eligible to compete, with 305 cities representing 45 states submitting applications last September. Providence was awarded the $5 million grand prize, while Chicago, Philadelphia, and Santa Monica were also awarded $1 million prizes.To learn more about the Mayors Challenge, visit bloomberg.org/mayorschallenge.

The Mayors Challenge Fan Favorite Selection, launched in partnership with The Huffington Post (www.huffingtonpost.com/mayors-challenge), allowed citizens to learn more about the bold and innovative ideas of the 20 Mayors Challenge finalists and vote for their favorite. Over 58,000 votes were cast between February 20 and March 6.

The Mayors Challenge is the latest initiative of Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Mayors Project, which aims to spread proven and promising ideas among cities. Other Mayors Project investments include Cities of Service, Innovation Delivery Teams, and Financial Empowerment Centers.

About Bloomberg Philanthropies 

Bloomberg Philanthropies is on a mission to improve and lengthen lives. We focus on five key areas to create lasting change: Public Health, Environment, Education, Government Innovation, which includes the Mayors Challenge, and Arts & Culture. Bloomberg Philanthropies encompasses all of Michael R. Bloomberg’s charitable activities, including his foundation and his personal giving. In 2012, $360 million was distributed. For more information, please visitwww.bloomberg.org.

For more information on Bloomberg Philanthropies, media should contact Meghan Womack, meghan@bloomberg.org.

About the City of Houston

With a population of 2.2 million people, Houston ranks as the nation’s 4th largest city. Known as the Energy Capital of the World, Houston is an entrepreneurial, diverse, cosmopolitan city where no one ethnic or racial group holds a majority. Twenty-five Fortune 500 companies call Houston home. It is also the site of NASA headquarters - the facility responsible for putting the first man on the moon - the Port of Houston and the 47 research and treatment institutions that comprise the world-renowned Texas Medical Center.



CLICK HERE TO VIEW THIS EDITION OF YOUR THOUGHT MATTERS NEWSPAPER

The Importance of Voting In Local Elections featuring Thoughts from Mayor Annise Parker and other City of Houston Leaders 

“The feature of this “Special Edition” of Your Thought Matters Newspaper is the section on the importance of voting in local elections. This “Special Edition” was made possible by Mayor Annise Parker, Mayor Allen Owen, Congressman Kevin Brady, Houston Controller Ronald C. Green, Houston Mayor Pro-Tem Ed Gonzalez, Houston At-Large City CM -Andrew C. Burks, Jr., Missouri City At-Large CM - Danny Nguyen, Houston City CM - Ellen Cohen, Houston City CM – Wanda Adams, Houston City CM – Mike Laster, Houston City CM – Larry V. Green. 2013 Candidate Georgia D. Provost for Houston’s District – D, 2013 Candidate Rodney Griffin for Missouri City’s District – A, 2013 Candidate for Re-Election to the FBISD School Board Jim Rice, and 2013 Candidate for FBISD School Board Cynthia Lenton Gary. Call Aubrey R. Taylor Communications at: (832)212-8735 to discuss your inclusion in the next edition of Your Thought Matters Newspaper." -- Aubrey R. Taylor, Publisher


CITY LEADERS ON THE IMPORTANCE OF VOTING IN LOCAL ELECTIONS
The City of Houston leaders at Houston's City Hall who contributed to this Your Thought Matters Newspaper feature are: Mayor Annise Parker (top left) At-Large Position 2 Houston City Council Member -- Andrew C. Burks (top right), City of Houston Controller -- Ronald C. Green (second row left), Houston's Mayor Pro-Tem and District H Council Member -- Ed Gonzalez (second row right), Houston City Council Member for District D -- Wanda Adams (third row on left), Houston City Council Member for District C -- Ellen Cohen (third row on right), Houston City Council Member for District J -- Mike Laster (bottom on left), and Houston City Council Member for District K -- Larry V. Green. All these individuals will be on the November 5, 2013 Mayoral Election ballot for the City of Houston; with the exception of Councilwoman Wanda Adams who is term-limited and can't run for re-election for her seat.

Mayor Annise Parker, Other Houston City Hall Leaders Answer Call to Share Their Thoughts On The Importance of Voting

“Mayor Annise Parker the 61st Mayor of Houston, and only the second woman to hold the position of chief executive officer for the City of Houston recently took a moment to share her thoughts on the importance of voting at the request of Aubrey R. Taylor, publisher of Your Thought Matters Newspaper. Other Houston City Hall leaders who also took the time out of their busy schedules to share their thoughts on the importance of voting in local elections were: Houston’s City Controller Ronald C. Green; Houston’s Mayor Pro-Tem Ed Gonzalez; Houston’s At-Large Position 2 Council Member Andrew C. Burks, Jr.; Houston’s District C Council Member Ellen Cohen; Houston’s District D Council Member Wanda Adams; Houston’s District J Council Member Mike Laster; and Houston’s District K Council Member Larry Green. I’m thankful that these leaders found value in our quest to inform, empower, inspire, and encourage Americans to get involved in local elections. For in the end, all politics are local.”




Mayor Annise Parker, Currently Only the Second Woman to serve as Houston's Chief Executive takes a Moment to Share Her Thoughts on The Importance of Voting 

"I remember voting as a kid with my parents. That was back in the days when you walked into a voting booth, pulled a red curtain behind you, picked your candidates and pulled a lever to cast your ballot. My parents took me every November, and I’ve gone every year as an adult. It’s important to vote for many reasons, but I’ll focus on three.

1) It’s the only opportunity we have, as citizens, to hold our elected officials accountable to the promises they make to us when they’re running for office. I’ve been elected eight times now, so I know that when I make a promise on the campaign trail, voters are listening, and voters will remind me of my promises when I come back in two years.

2) Someone said to me recently – if you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu. Elected officials make very important decisions about how your money is spent and what limits are placed on your life. It’s important that your elected officials know that you care about your rights and your money – and the best way to show them that you care is to vote.

3) And finally, 150 years ago, voting was reserved for a privileged few. African Americans and women risked their lives fighting for the right to vote. They won in 1870 and 1920, respectively. That isn’t very long ago, and every election I am proud to honor those brave civil rights activists by heading to the polls and casting a ballot."

Sincerely,

Annise Parker

The 61st Mayor of Houston, Texas
CLICK HERE TO SEE SPOTLIGHT


Houston City Controller Ronald C. Green Shares His Thoughts on the Importance of Participating in Local Elections

“In times like these it is important that all who can vote should exercise their right to. Not at any moment in our time has our country been so politically polarized, we have gun law bills, budget and deficit issues, the issues that are currently being discussed in Washington have a trickle-down effect to cities and local municipalities. It is important that we have the right leadership in place so that our city is ready to handle those problems. Locally, our economy, public project initiatives and quality of life all depend on the representation YOU the citizen vote for. The City of Houston’s leadership helps in making decisions that make sure that the aforementioned are available to you. That is why it is important for you to participate in local elections. In no other elections, state or nationally, can you personally hold your elected official accountable for the well being of the city that you live in. You want and need responsible men and women to make sure that your taxes are being put to good use, whether you are Republican or Democrat. We need YOU to help Houston thrive as a city, we need YOU to ensure Houston has the quality of life for families and visitors to enjoy and prosper in. Your vote helps in achieving those goals.”

Sincerely,

Ronald C. Green
Houston City Controller
CLICK HERE TO SEE SPOTLIGHT


City of Houston Mayor Pro-Tem, District H Council Member Ed Gonzalez Shares His Thoughts on Why Voting Matters

“Voting is a fundamental right granted to us by our forefathers, it is a right that sets our nation apart from many in the world, and it is a right that I encourage all citizens to exercise. Elections impact who represents us at every level of government, those representatives are the individuals that advocate for the needs of our communities, of our families, and of our future generations. Electing a representative ensures that your voice is heard at City Hall, at the State Capitol, and in Washington D.C. As a local elected official, I take pride in fighting for the needs of the District H constituents that I represent. Keeping our neighborhoods safe, ensuring that our roads are in good condition, increasing the amount of greenspace in the community, and encouraging economic development are some of my main priorities. I know that I was elected to serve my community and I strive to listen to its needs each and every single day. I sincerely hope that all voters will take time to cast a ballot, particularly during a local election. Our government is only as good as the people that we send to represent us. Make sure that you head to the voting booth and continue to make your voice heard.”

Sincerely,

Ed Gonzalez

Mayor Pro-Tem, City of Houston
CLICK HERE TO SEE SPOTLIGHT


Houston City Council Member Andrew C. Burks Shares His Thoughts On The Importance of Participating In Local Elections

"Exercising your right to vote in local elections gives you a powerful voice in the issues that directly impact our family. When we think about the political decisions that make the greatest differences in our lives, we often think about Washington, D.C. But the truth is that some of the decisions that have the largest impact on us are made at City Hall.

The brave police officers and fire fighters keeping us safe depend upon responsible local elected officials to ensure they are effective. The roads we drive on, the water we drink, and the parks and libraries our families use are all maintained by your local elected officials.

The services we use most are local. That is why it is important to participate in local elections. When you have a concern, it is your locally elected officials who are the most responsive. As members of the community, mayors and council members are more in touch with the everyday needs of our neighbors. As a voter, you want to ensure that the services impacting you the most are in the hands of someone you can trust and who understands your needs.

Your vote makes its biggest difference in local elections. Low turnout in local races means your voice is louder and stronger. Your participation ensures your needs are represented and that our city will remain a great place to call home for generations to come.”

Sincerely,

Andrew C. Burks Jr.
City Council At-Large Position 2
CLICK HERE TO SEE SPOTLIGHT


Houston City Council District C Representative Ellen Cohen Takes A Moment to Share Her Thoughts On The Importance of Participating in Local Elections

“Democracy is the cornerstone of our country from the federal level down to the local level. I was raised to believe that democracy means “one person, one vote,” and that exercising your vote is a responsibility as well as a right. In a politically polarized nation, making your voice heard from the ballot box becomes even more urgent.

In Houston, though voter turnout in our last national election (2012) was above 60%, unfortunately, in our last localelection (2011) turnout was less than 15%. This is particularly regrettable because all politics is local. Local government is responsible for the most immediate concerns of our citizens’ daily lives. From streets to parks to libraries to water, your local government officials make or influence the policy decisions that impact our lives. Consequently, holding elected officials accountable for their decisions is vital to a well-functioning city, state, or nation.

Furthermore, particularly in a local election, every vote is critical. Elections that are determined by 10, 100, or 500 votes are more common than many citizens are aware. Since a small voting pool magnifies the effect of a singular vote, participating in a local election can have a great impact on your life. Enfranchisement for all has been hard-won in America, and we owe it to our forebears to honor their sacrifices by exercising the right and responsibility to vote.”

Sincerely,

Ellen Cohen
Houston City Council District C
CLICK HERE TO SEE SPOTLIGHT


Houston City Council Member Wanda Adams Shares Her Thoughts on The Importance of Voting in Our Local Elections

“Many times, local elections do not receive a high voter turnout rate because individuals feel that those elections are not as important as voting for national elected officials. Voting in local elections is actually more important because it is the best way to have your voice heard immediately. Local elected officials are the individuals who carry-out fiscal mandates, laws, and actions that are created on a national and state level. Citizens should see their local officials working in their communities by the projects that are being completed in their neighborhoods. The Mayor and City Council choose city department leaders who make decisions regarding infrastructure repair, water services, health services, solid waste services, libraries, parks, and many other services that affect everyone living in the city. These elected officials are the public servants that you should see physically working in the community and working for the community. They have vested interests that are parallel to their constituents because they drive your streets daily, visit the parks with their loved ones, receive city services, and live in your neighborhoods. Local officials know your concerns because they share them. If someone isn’t voting in local elections, they are saying that they are not concerned with the issues that matter most – the issues that affect home.”

Sincerely,

Wanda Adams
Houston City Council District D
CLICK HERE TO SEE SPOTLIGHT


Houston City Council Member Mike Laster Shares his thoughts on the importance of voting in local Elections

“Local elections are important because local government is the foundation of democracy. Your voice is heard the most at the local level and local officials are some of the most accessible and responsive to the voting public. Your daily life is directly affected by local government – from trash pick-up to pot holes to police and fire services to building permits. All of us are called upon to build up our communities and participation in local elections is the most effective way to do that.”

Sincerely,

Mike Laster
Houston City Council District J
CLICK HERE TO SEE SPOTLIGHT


Shared Thoughts from Houston City Council District K Council Member Larry V. Green on Why it's Important for Voters to Participate in Local City-Wide Elections

“It is important for voters to participate in local city-wide elections because elected officials can help determine the economic, educational and social well-being of entire communities. For example, two very important tasks of city council members include making laws and allocating money. Elected officials are the gatekeepers for millions of dollars in tax revenue—that is, money paid by anyone in the public old enough to purchase taxable merchandise, own property, or earn a paycheck. Elected officials control which individuals, groups, communities, businesses, and institutions receive taxpayer dollars, how much they receive, and the purpose for which they can use the money.

Local elected officials are public servants who serve at the pleasure of ordinary citizens—like you and me. For example, in city elections in Houston, every two years voters go to the polls to decide whether their elected officials deserve another term in office. Ultimately, elected officials, including me, are judged by the quality of our leadership. Are we accessible to the public? Do we represent all demographics, rich, poor, everyone? Do we bring money or other resources back to our Districts? Do our decisions or voting record reflect the priorities we promised when asking for your vote?

The policies generated from your participation in local city-wide elections shape almost every aspect of our lives. It is important that voters do not take a back seat in the political decisions that result in these policies. Let your voice be heard by voting in all local city-wide elections.”

Sincerely,


Larry V. Green, Esq.
Houston City Council District K
CLICK HERE TO SEE SPOTLIGHT